|
   Text A+ A- A Subscribe to Community College of Philadelphia RSS

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Annette John-Hall, 215-751-8021, anhall@ccp.edu


Quit Smoking, if Only for the Day


PHILADELPHIA, Pa. Nov. 7, 2016 – By quitting—even for one day—smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk.

Community College of Philadelphia, which will go smoke-free on Jan. 1, 2017, is setting the stage by hosting the Great American Smokeout from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17 in the Bonnell Building lobby, located on 17th Street, between Spring Garden and Callowhill streets.

A turkey mascot will be on hand for photos with students and faculty, and information and cessation materials will be available to those who are thinking about kicking the habit – even if just for the day. The American Heart Association and Philadelphia Department of Health are partnering on the event, as they have been working closely with the College as it prepares its Main Campus and three regional centers to go smoke-free.

Dr. Kristy Shuda McGuire, an associate professor of Biology, has been a leader of the smoke-free movement since its beginning six years ago. As a pregnant faculty member, she said she constantly had to put up with second-hand smoke as she walked into her building. She and others began to push for tighter restrictions for health and career reasons.

More and more hospitals and medical businesses in many states are adopting strict policies against smoking as a way to increase worker productivity, reduce health care costs and encourage healthier living. Some organizations go as far prohibiting smokers from applying for jobs. As colleges prepare and educate students for the local workforce, the issue resonates with faculty and staff.

“The College needs to be preparing its Nursing and Allied Health students for employment at area hospitals that no longer hire smokers, including Thomas Jefferson University and the University of Pennsylvania,” McGuire said. “That’s one reason why we felt it was really important to implement this policy.”

The College’s students had an important role to play in gathering information for the implementation of the policy. A survey conducted in 2015 by students in Associate Professor Rick Frei’s Descriptive Research Methods in Psychology class examined student attitudes about smoking behavior, reasons for smoking, and attempts to quit. The survey found that students who smoke tend to have lower grade point averages and suffer from stress and depression. Smoking is also an expensive habit. Additionally, surveyed students reported that they spent as much as $24 a week for tobacco products.

With more than 28,000 students, Community College of Philadelphia will become the largest student population to go smoke-free in Philadelphia. The University of Pennsylvania, with 24,876 students, went smoke-free last September. Currently, approximately 1,500 higher education institutions in the United States have gone smoke- or tobacco-free, including 330 community colleges.

The American Heart Association and Philadelphia Department of Health will provide awareness activities for the Great American Smokeout, including carbon monoxide testing, and a “tar jar,” that graphically demonstrating the amount of tar in tobacco smoke. The College will also sponsor a Quest to be Smoke Free scavenger hunt, awarding a $25 gift card to the first 15 students who finish. Students will also pledge to take a 30-day, smoke-free challenge.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Gas Distribution Pipeline Mechanic Open House Events Form

Join us on January 12 or January 18, 2017, from 4 to 6 p.m. for an open house to see how we can help prepare you for an entry-level career in the natural gas industry.

Open House Location
Center for Business and Industry
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Learn more about our Gas Distribution Pipeline Mechanic training.

You must have Javascript enabled to use this form.

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Annette John-Hall, 215-751-8021, anhall@ccp.edu

 

WHAT: Students from the Computer Information Systems program at Community College of Philadelphia are taking their skills into the community — by offering free computer training workshops for those looking to advance their skills.

There are two workshops to choose from: “Managing, Maintaining and Troubleshooting Problems on Your Computer: Personalize Windows to Your Liking” will teach novices how to keep their computers running smoothly, how to customize settings, troubleshoot and more.

A second workshop, “Website Browsing and Privacy Tools: Advanced Windows Features” will provide more advanced users the skills to surf the web with confidence, including email traces, configuring wireless access, managing schedules and utilizing Windows commands.

WHEN: Both workshops will be held from 2PM-3:30PM, Wednesday, November 16th

WHERE: Both workshops will take place in Room C3-18 in the Center for Business and Industry, located on the corner of 18th and Callowhill streets. RSVP now, because space is limited.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Annette John-Hall, 215-751-8021, anhall@ccp.edu

WHAT: Students who utilize healthcare services persist through their courses of study at a higher rate and achieve significantly higher grade point averages compared to students who don’t. So Community College of Philadelphia is partnering with Single Stop USA to increase student completion rates by connecting students to available healthcare services.

It will kick off its awareness campaign with Health Care Enrollment Day, when healthcare experts and navigators will be on campus to answer questions as students review health care options, including the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid and Medicare. Enrollment and re-enrollment will be ongoing through January 31, 2017, the last day to enroll in or change a 2017 health plan.

Access to affordable, quality health care is critically important for young people as they reach adulthood and enter the job market. It gives them peace of mind that allows them to focus on their studies, helps them stay healthy as they join the workforce, and is vital to building a strong economy and a strong middle class. “We are moving the needle on student completion because they are able to stay in school and graduate,” said Paula Umaña, Single Stop project director.

The day will also include a health expo in partnership with the College’s Women’s Outreach and Advocacy Center. Participating organizations include: AccessMatters, Cognosante, Philadelphia Department of Health, Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania, and Get Healthy Philly. Language translators will be available.

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday, November 9

WHERE: Community College of Philadelphia’s Bonnell Lobby, located on 17th Street between Spring Garden and Callowhill streets.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Annette John-Hall, 215-751-8021, anhall@ccp.edu


WHAT: Students don’t need to stop earning credits over winter break. Community College of Philadelphia offers affordable online courses during the 2016 winter break to help students accelerate their degree completion. Guest students from other colleges and universities also are invited to enroll. “When you take a class over winter break you can accelerate your path to a degree,” said Dr. Samuel Hirsch, vice president for Academic and Student Success. “These three-credit courses will require 6-8 hours of work daily, so students must be committed to dedicating their time to the coursework and be prepared for a fast pace over the course of the four-week term.”

Twelve, three-credit courses are available. However, to help students achieve the best results possible, enrollment is restricted to one course. Each course requires six to eight hours of work daily, so students must be committed to their coursework and be prepared for a fast pace over the course of the four-week term.

Course offerings for 2016 include: Addiction Studies (Behavioral Health and Human Services 121); Environmental Conservation (Earth Science 111); U.S. History: The 20th Century (History 103); Global History I (History 103); Cultural Traditions (Humanities 102); Juvenile Justice (Justice 171); Introduction to Paralegal Studies (Paralegal Studies 101); Ethical Problems (Philosophy 211); American Government (Political Science 111); Developmental Psychology (Psychology 215); Real Estate Fundamentals (Real Estate 101), and Introduction to Sociology (Sociology 101).

WHEN: Classes run December 19th, 2016 through January 13th, 2017

HOW: Continuing students in good standing can register online at http://ccp.edu/winter-term Tuition for Philadelphia residents is $153 per credit hour.

* It is strongly recommended that students have their own personal computer or access to a household computer.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Annette John-Hall, 215-751-8021, anhall@ccp.edu


PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Nov. 1- The first week of the SEPTA strike stranded hundreds of Community College of Philadelphia students who rely on the buses, subways and trolleys to get them to and from the College, but faculty members tried to come up with practical and creative ways to accommodate impacted students to ensure that normal learning can continue.

The College’s Main Campus and Northeast. Northwest and West regional centers experienced 25 to 50 percent absenteeism in early morning classes. Attendance improved as the day went on. Some students conveyed to professors that although they didn’t make it to class, they were working to secure alternative transportation for the remainder of the week. Others walked two to three miles to get to school. Still others caught an early ride from friends and family and arrived on campus an hour before their classes started because it was the only ride they could get.

From the Northeast to West regional centers, the College community came together to help each other. Faculty members called on their resourcefulness and quickly pivoted to respond to their students’ needs.

* Dr. Faye Allard, who teaches five classes, discussed the possibility of a strike with her students on Monday. She asked them to recommend ways that they could proceed with class work. Students suggested that online lectures might work best for them because smart phones if necessary Allard then recorded her lecture online and recording online lectures for students who can’t make it to class.

* Julie Odell, an associate professor of English, created a Facebook page for to organize carpools for her students. She also has arranged class discussion via Canvas, an online learning management system used to organize and evaluate learning.

* Three students showed up in Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela’s morning English class, so the assistant professor took them to coffee, where they discussed the class reading. Johnson-Valenzuela is also switching assignment deadlines and planning some online instruction, though she points out that many students enrolled in traditional classrooms don’t have internet access in their homes. “I plan

on sending an email to remind students to use their local libraries for computer access and study space,” she said.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Annette John-Hall, 215-751-8021, anhall@ccp.edu

 

Veterans Days Ceremony and Comcast Jobs Fair Help Bridge Transition Between Military Service and Workforce

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Oct. 20- Each year, Community College of Philadelphia takes time out on Veterans Day to salute its Veteran students with a reverent ceremony that honors their dedication and sacrifice.

This year, in conjunction with Comcast Corporation, which will hire more than 10,000 members of the military community by the end of 2017, the College will host a veterans’ jobs fair, along with the traditional ceremony to honor the commitment of those who serve and have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. The College’s Veterans Resource Center provides support and services to more than 700 students this year, a diverse group of active duty, retired, Reservist and National Guard veterans.

The Comcast Career Fair for Veterans will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. in room S2-19 of the Winnet Student Life Building, and will be open to the College’s student veterans and alumni, as well as those currently serving in the National Guard and Reserve. The effects of today’s economy, along with the growing number of veterans returning home, can make finding a job difficult. Approximately one out of every two (53 percent) post 9/11 veterans will face a period of unemployment while transitioning from the military to the workforce.

Comcast has addressed that need through participation in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Hiring Our Heroes initiative, a program that helps veterans and military spouses find meaningful employment. From 2012 through 2015, the company hired approximately 5,900 veterans and is on track to meet its hiring commitment.

This year’s Veterans Day ceremony begins at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 on the ground floor of the Bonnell Building. The date and time marks the armistice signed between the allies of World War I and Germany, which took place on the “11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month” of 1918. In 1954, after the United States concluded its involvement in World War II and the Korean War, the holiday was renamed Veterans Day to honor the brave soldiers who fought in all three wars.

The observance begins with a color guard entrance and features keynote speaker William A. Baas, vice president of talent, Comcast Northeast Region. Baas currently holds the rank of Captain in the U.S. Navy Reserve, and has over 25 years of total active and reserve experience in the field of cryptologic warfare. He is an acknowledged visionary behind Comcast NBCUniversal’s military hiring successes and is regarded as a national thought leader in military hiring. He will be joined by Angel Arocho, senior director of operations compliance at Comcast and former U.S. Marine Corps sergeant; and Frederick Soejanto, a 2012 graduate who serves as a medical logistics officer and a detachment executive, who currently holds the rank of a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Sept. 15 - In an historic city where America’s forefathers once gathered to sign the Declaration of Independence; Community College of Philadelphia and BillyPenn.com will host “Your Vote is Your Voice,” a voter registration event, from 1 to 3 PM Thursday, Sept. 22 in the Bonnell Building Lobby ( located on 17th Street between Spring Garden and Callowhill streets).

On that same day, the College will also observe Constitution Day with a full slate of law and justice panels hosted by the Fox Rothschild Center for Law and Society in Room C2-28 of the Center for Business and Industry (located on the corner of 18th and Callowhill streets).

The program will have a plethora of civic activities, educational games, and giveaways. Ben Franklin will take “selfies” with guests from 1:00 to 2:30 PM.; Community College of Philadelphia students will perform spoken word poetry at 2:00 pm; and students can fill out “Why I Vote” cards, which will be displayed on the pledge wall in the Bonnell Lobby. Voter registration tables with laptops will be available for on-the-spot registration. In addition, free pocket constitutions will be handed out and new voters can use simulated voting machines.

The National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement has released the first-of-its kind analysis of the voting patterns of 7.4 million college students at 783 higher education institutions. They found the College’s students exhibit strong levels of engagement. Student voting rates were much higher (63 percent in the 2012 presidential election) than student voting rates of other two- year institutions (44.8 percent).

The College community works to make a difference in the civic life of the city. In 2012, Rock the Vote organizers registered 154 new voters during a day-long event on the Main Campus. In addition, when the right to vote was threatened during the presidential election, 50 students received new college IDs that enabled them to vote.

Commemorating the formation and signing of the U.S. Constitution on September 17, 1787, Constitution Day presentations and panel discussions run from 9:40 AM to 4: 10 PM. All the events are free and open to the public, as is the registration drive.

The Constitution sessions include: “Technology and the Constitution,” an exploration of how to apply existing law to 21st century challenges, presented by Elizabeth Canapary, Esq., adjunct professor of Paralegal Studies; “An Overview of the Bill of Rights,” a discussion of amendments of the Constitution, presented by William Mulkeen, Esq., visiting lecturer of Justice and Paralegal Studies; “Our Voices, Our Votes, Our Power – Achieving Systemic Change Through Civic Engagement and Voting,” a look at reforming the criminal justice system through civic engagement and voting; and “The Electoral College,” a discussion of popular versus electoral votes, presented by William Love, Esq., professor of Justice and Social Science department chair.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

PHILADELPHIA, SEPT. 17 – Community College of Philadelphia seeks to provide every neighborhood in the city access to highly-skilled technical careers with its new, conveniently located Advanced Manufacturing courses.

This year, the College launched an historic partnership with the Philadelphia School District’s Benjamin Franklin High School Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Engineering, which will allow it to offer technical courses at that location in the evenings and on Saturdays, when high school classes are not in session. The high school is just blocks from the College’s Main Campus near Center City, and major public transportation hubs.

The first three technical training programs begin in October: Welding Technology, CNC Precision Machining Technology and Electro-Mechanical/Mechatronics Technology. All these courses provide a path to high-paying, entry-level careers, with salaries starting at $23 an hour, depending on the industry.

As a result of a new grant, eligible students may be able to attend classes this fall for free. All three advanced manufacturing programs have been approved for Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) funding. Prospective students can contact a local PA CareerLink office to determine if they are eligible to receive vouchers to cover the costs of the training programs..

Advanced manufacturing is a growing industry that uses technology to produce, improve, and design the products people use daily. According to a recent Philadelphia Works report, core industries in advanced manufacturing grew by 13 percent between 2007 and 2013.

The creation of the College’s program came out of a task force, cited in the city’s Office of Manufacturing & Industry 2016 Annual Report, which was charged to come up with ways to best serve students and employers city-wide. “We are partners in the success of students and in the development of its businesses,” said Donald Guy Generals, president of Community College of Philadelphia. Classes will run on Saturdays and evenings starting Oct. 1. To learn more, visit the College website.

 

###

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

Dr. Ron McCurdy, a jazz musician and professor of music at the University of Southern California, pays tribute to the works of poet Langston Hughes in a multi-media performance.

The jazz riffs of Ron McCurdy’s sweet trumpet wafted out of the Bonnell Auditorium, piquing the curiosity of passersby. Inside, a sepia image of literary giant Langston Hughes, superimposed on a big screen behind the musicians, provided a fitting backdrop for telling the story of one writer’s struggle for artistic and social freedom.

On Oct. 27, Community College of Philadelphia students watched and listened to a special multimedia concert performance of Langston Hughes’ 12-part, epic poem, “Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz,” performed Dr. Ronald C. McCurdy, a professor of music at the University of Southern California, who, along with his trio of musicians, traveled from Los Angeles to educate and entertain the College community about jazz, poetry and justice.

Student Life organized and hosted the concert to recognize and celebrate the diversity in all cultures.

“It is important to remember that our students are not only Latino during Latina/o History Month, gay during LGBT History Month, Black during Black History Month, etc. They are these things all the time,” said David Greene, Director of Student Life. “The mission of Student Life is to help students gain a better understanding of themselves and their communities. The Langston Hughes project allows us to achieve that mission.”

Most students kept their hands in their laps when McCurdy asked them to raise their hands if they had ever heard of Hughes - all the more important to learn about a man who was arguably the most important African American poet of the 20th century; a leader of the Harlem Renaissance; a social activist and one of the earliest innovators of the literary art form known as jazz poetry.

With the help of video montages, the concert performance linked the words and music of Hughes' poetry to topical images of people, places, and events, and to the works of the visual artists Langston Hughes admired. Together the words, sounds, and images recreated moments in African American history, which bridged the Harlem Renaissance and the post- World War II Beat writers' coffeehouse jazz poetry world to the looming Black Arts performance explosion of the 1960s.

Perhaps no one on campus understands music’s connection to learning better than Dr. Donald Guy Generals, the College’s president. Dr. Generals, himself a jazz musician, has played the drums at College events and believes that the arts enrich learning and inspire creativity.

Artists such as Hughes, he noted, evoke questions, provide answers and heighten curiosity that is crucial to student success.

“I think the way that you learn, how you learn, and the company that you keep while you learn, are important,” Dr. Generals said in an interview conducted earlier this year. “The environment in which you learn enables you to be innovative because you are around different points of view. Innovation can manifest itself through many ways, through many media and in many formats. To the extent that we foster curricula that encourages creative thinking, I think that adds to the overall direction and soul of the city.”

Hughes originally created “Ask Your Mama” after Newport Jazz Festival of July 1960. The musical scoring of the poem was designed to forge a conversation and a commentary with the music. It remained only in the planning stages when Hughes died in 1967. McCurdy’s discovery of it, and subsequent performance, provides an illuminating learning experience for all who experience it.

Pages