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PHILADELPHIA, September 12, 2006-Community College of Philadelphia reaches out to the business community with a breakfast that will speak to The Future of Philadelphia, Bridging Education and Work. At 8 a.m., September 20, at the College's Center for Business and Industry, 18th and Callowhill streets, speakers Bruce E. Toll, co-owner and chairman of The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News, and David B. Thornburgh, president and chief executive officer of the Alliance for Regional Stewardship, will address business trends and the need for a well-trained workforce.

"Educational attainment is . the coin of the realm in the world of regional competitiveness," Thornburgh said, adding that communities that have an educated workforce attract more jobs, investment and people.

The College plays a significant role in the region's business community. During budget hearings before City Council in March, Stephen M. Curtis, Ph.D., president of Community College of Philadelphia, outlined some of the College's economic strengths. "We generate more than $100 million in operating and capital revenue annually through our graduates, students and employees," he said, adding that 79 percent of the College's graduates are employed in the city within one year after graduation.

This invitation-only breakfast is a part of a day long series of events that kicks off The Path to PossibilitiesT, an integrated marketing and brand initiative designed to inform the business community, civic leaders, government officials, students and the general public about the many high quality educational, professional development and customized corporate training programs at the College.

The Path to PossibilitiesT brand initiative is driven by extensive research the College had the CLARUS Corporation conduct on its behalf over the past year. This research shows many area employers are not aware the College can help their bottom lines. Surveys of 400 of the largest employers in Greater Philadelphia showed that many did not know the College offered specialized business training programs.

Fifty-five percent of the employers expect a shortage of qualified job candidates in the future. In addition, the employers reported that only 26 percent of their employees have two-year or four-year college degrees or higher.

The goal is to link these employers with the College's educational programs that offer more than 70 associate degree and certificate programs.

In addition to the business breakfast, on September 20th there will be something for everyone. The College will unveil the new brand initiative at 10 a.m. Following this presentation, there will be a Careers of Tomorrow Fair for the youth market where high school students will have an opportunity to tour the College campus, have hands-on demonstrations and get inspired by a local celebrity. This day will culminate with the Explore Your Possibilities: Open House, Career and Job Fair that will connect residents with employers and enable them to brush up on their business communication and Microsoft Office skills at mini-workshops.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
8:00 -10:00 a.m.
Business Community Breakfast (invitation only), Center for Business and Industry

10:00-10:30 a.m.
"The Launch," CBI
A festive unveiling of a new marketing and brand initiative that will acquaint the regional business community, civic leaders, students and the general public with the College's courses and programs

4:30-7:00 p.m.
"Explore Your Possibilities: Open House, Career and Job Fair," CBI
College administrators will provide information about programs, courses, the admissions process and financial aid; hands-on training with helpful hints to enhance the public's Microsoft Office and business communication skills; and local employment opportunities

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21: Northeast Regional Center, 12901 Townsend Road
8:00 a.m. Northeast Chamber of Commerce breakfast (invitation only)
2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Open House - high school and college students will receive information about the College's associate's degree programs and financial aid

5:00 - 8:00 p.m. Mini Job Fair featuring employers such as the Philadelphia Police
Department, the Pennsylvania Armory National Guard, United Parcel Service, the Philadelphia Federal Credit Union and Homestead Senior Care

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23: West Philadelphia Regional Center, 4725 Chestnut Street
9:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Open House: Education and Career Workshops for Adults. Mini-workshops will be held concurrently from 10:30 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. on topics such as "Financing Your Education" and "Surviving and Thriving in College"

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26: Northwest Regional Center, 1300 W. Godfrey Avenue
11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Open House: Education, Access and PersistenceWorkshops for students from area high schools on topics such as "How to Stay in College" and "Making Math Fun"

PHILADELPHIA, August 31, 2006 - The fall semester starts at Community College of Philadelphia on Sept. 5 with an exciting array of new courses, programs and initiatives that will help put students, young and adult, on a solid path toward achieving their educational, professional and corporate training goals.

Among the new initiatives is "Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count," a national effort that aims to help more community college students - particularly students of color and low-income students - earn a degree or certificate or successfully transfer to a four-year institution to further their education.

Community College of Philadelphia was selected in July to participate. There are now 57 other institutions from nine states involved. The College received a $50,000 grant to plan and launch the initiative on campus. An Achieving the Dream coach and data facilitator are provided to help the College.

"The initiative emphasizes the use of data to produce systemic change and focuses colleges on measurable outcomes," said Stephen M. Curtis, president of Community College of Philadelphia.

Funding for the initiative in Pennsylvania comes from the Heinz Foundation. Additional funding nationally comes from the Lumina Foundation, as well as other key national partners.

Students at the College also will have the opportunity to explore their possibilities as the College launches an initiative to acquaint the business community, civic leaders and the general public with the many high quality educational, professional development and customized corporate training programs and services offered at the College.

"The Path to Possibilities" events will showcase the College and all it has to offer. They will include "The Launch" at 10 a.m., Sept. 20 at the College's Center for Business and Industry (CBI), 18th and Callowhill streets, and a free career and job fair from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at CBI. Students and the general public will be able to hear from local businesses about employment opportunities and to gain hands-on training to enhance their computer and business communication skills. Job fairs and open houses also will be held at the College's three neighborhood Regional Centers (see www.ccp.edu/event for more details).

This fall, the College also has added several new programs to the more than 70 degree and certificate programs it already offers. One of the new programs is a 33-credit certificate program in Creative Writing coordinated by novelist and faculty member Simone Zelitch and featuring gifted faculty, such as Elaine Terranova, who in June won a $50,000 Pew Fellowships in the Arts award. The College also added more courses this year to its Computer Forensics program, which prepares students to help solve crimes, such as computer hacking and computer fraud.

Initiatives such as Achieving the Dream and new courses, such as Creative Writing, demonstrate that Community College of Philadelphia is The Path to Possibilities for residents of Philadelphia.

PHILADELPHIA, July 27, 2006 - Philadelphia residents who attend Community College of Philadelphia will receive a one-time credit off their tuition this year thanks to an additional $1 million the city has provided the College.

The College family thanks the Mayor and City Council and an acknowledgment of the additional city support will be noted on students' tuition bills. The Mayor and City Council approved the budget increase after students, faculty and administrators at the College requested the city provide more funding to the school this fiscal year.

"In direct meetings with both the Mayor and members of City Council, we urged the city to resume a pattern of increasing support for the College and committed that any increase this year would be passed on directly to students," President Stephen M. Curtis said.

At city budget hearings in March, Victor B. Smith Jr., the president of the Student Government Association; Christina Taing, the SGA second vice president; and Carla Lucille Johnson, who returned to college after 24 years in the work world after her employer closed, also appealed to City Council for help.

As a result, the city's fiscal year 2006-2007 budget allocation to the College is $23.4 million. Last year, it was $22.4 million. Community College of Philadelphia will continue to work to keep its tuition affordable. Currently, tuition for Philadelphia residents is $112 per credit hour. In-state residents pay $224 per credit hour and out-of-state residents pay $336 per credit hour. A Philadelphia resident taking a single three-credit-hour course (the typical number of credit hours per course) pays $336. The one-time "city tuition credit" will reduce tuition for Philadelphia residents only by $3 per credit hour for 2006-2007.

"I want to thank all the students, faculty and staff who advocated for more city support throughout the spring months. Your efforts have directly helped our students," President Stephen M. Curtis said.

PHILADELPHIA, July 26, 2006 - The National Association of College and University Business Officers has selected Thomas R. Hawk, vice president of Planning and Finance, and treasurer for Community College of Philadelphia, to receive its 2006 Distinguished Business Officer award.

"In a career that began nearly four decades ago as a faculty member in the department of Economics and Accounting at the (College), and having twice served as interim president, he exemplifies the dedication and commitment to higher education that this award celebrates," NACUBO stated.

Hawk is the first business officer from a community college to receive this award from the 44-year-old, Washington, D.C.-based trade group that serves a membership of more than 2,500 colleges, universities and higher education institutions across the nation.

"I am extremely grateful to have been selected for this honor," Hawk said.

His responsibilities as chief fiscal, administrative and planning officer at the College include overseeing the $120 million annual budget of the College; multi-year financial, capital and facility planning; and treasury and cash management. He also oversees more than 100 administrative, clerical and support staff; insurance and risk management; institutional research; and all facility management functions, including buildings and grounds, operations, off-campus real estate and facility improvements.

Each year NACUBO selects distinguished business officers to honor who make outstanding contributions in the field of business and financial management in higher education, normally over a number of years. Hawk was one of two people selected this year for NACUBO's most prestigious honor.

Hawk started at the College in 1967 as a professor in the economics and accounting department and has twice served as interim College president, both in 1994 and 1999.

He has a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.B.A. from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. from the College of Wooster.

He also has served as chair of the Pennsylvania Community College Business Officers, was a member of the Middle States Commission on Higher Education Advisory Committee on Institutional Financial Resources, chaired two Middle States Association accreditation teams, was a member of the national Center for Higher Education Management Systems Task Force on Intra-Institutional Management and participated in Philadelphia's Community Leadership program.

PHILADELPHIA, June 28, 2006 - Stephen M. Curtis, president of Community College of Philadelphia, has appointed Samuel Hirsch as the new vice president for Student Affairs, effective July 10.

"Dr. Hirsch is an experienced educator and administrator, who for the past 19 years, has provided outstanding leadership for a wide range of programs and services in support of students at the Main Campus and our three Regional Centers," President Curtis said.

Hirsch said some of the areas he will focus on in his new position include outreach to and recruitment of high school students and strategies to retain current students.

"I'm excited about the opportunity for implementing strategies and initiatives to improve retention and the completion rates of students. I also look forward to enhancing the students' experience at the College," Hirsch said.

Currently, Hirsch is dean of Educational Support Services at the College, a post he has held since 1987. In his current position, he supervises the planning and administration of all College-wide academic support services and student support programs, including the developmental education and English as a Second Language programs, the Learning Lab, Center on Disability, Academic Advising and Assessment Center.

He also manages a wide range of partnerships, which he developed and implemented, that help students successfully transition from secondary education into associate's degree programs and then into baccalaureate degree programs. These initiatives include high school on-campus programs such as Advanced Tech at College, Gateway to College, Advance @ College, TRIO Upward Bound and dual admissions programs with seven area universities and colleges.

Hirsch has obtained and managed more than 15 grants totaling more than $4.5 million annually, which represent two-thirds of the College's total grant funding.

One of those grants will help the College, this fall, kick off the Gateway to College program, which will enable at-risk youths, ages 16 to 20, to simultaneously take courses at the College towards a diploma while also earning credits toward an associate's college degree or certificate. Gateway to College is part of a national effort known as the Early College High School Initiative, which is supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, along with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Throughout his career, Hirsch has made numerous presentations at professional meetings and national conferences. He also has consulted for a variety of colleges and organizations. In 2001, he was selected by the American Association of Community Colleges to be one of five national mentors in the Teaching Scholar Partnership, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. In 2004, he was selected to participate in the association's Future Leaders Institute.

Hirsch has a Bachelor of Arts from Temple University, a Master of Arts in Education from Arcadia University and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Wilmington College.

PHILADELPHIA, June 08, 2006 - Earleena Sewell, a senior at John Bartram High School, and Michael Lightner, a senior at Strawberry Mansion High School, will be in the enviable position of attending two graduations this month.

One graduation will be at their respective high schools. The other will be at Community College of Philadelphia, where they will graduate from the high school portion of the Advanced Tech at College program, which allows high school students, interested in careers in information technology, to earn college credits while completing their last two years of high school on the College's campus.

"It was really challenging," said Sewell, 18, of Southwest Philadelphia, who said she was thankful for the teachers, counselors and mentors in the Advanced Tech at College program who became like a second family to her.

"It was a mix of students from different high schools," said Lightner, 18, of North Philadelphia. "It proved that people can get together from different sections of the city for positive change in their lives."

Sewell and Lightner will be among the students honored at the program's first graduation at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, June 14 in the Rotunda in the College's Mint Building on Spring Garden Street between 16th and 17th Streets.

Both students said they will be the first among their siblings to graduate from high school and, if all goes well, they expect to be the first to graduate from college.

Advanced Tech at College is a dual enrollment program that gives students the opportunity to earn up to 24 college credits while completing their high school diploma

requirements. Full completion of the program entails obtaining an associate's degree and then either entering the workforce or continuing on to a four-year college or university.

The goal of the program is to improve student retention and ultimately increase college graduation rates and job preparedness, particularly in the field of information technology.

Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the program is a partnership between the College, the School District of Philadelphia and SEPTA. In their junior year of high school, students participate in internships at the College and at Philadelphia-based businesses and nonprofit organizations.

About 30 students are admitted into the program each year. Students come from Philadelphia public schools that have low attendance and graduation rates and high dropout rates. This year's graduates are from the Bartram, Strawberry Mansion, West Philadelphia, Bok, Furness and Kensington high schools.

To qualify for the program, students must have at least a 2.5 grade point average, and they must have maintained an attendance of at least 90 percent in their freshmen and sophomore years. Students also must demonstrate an interest in pursuing a career in information technology.

Sewell liked Community College of Philadelphia so much that she plans to attend in the fall. Originally, she wanted to be an information technology teacher. Now, she is leaning toward a possible career as a paralegal. Lightner first plans to enter the Army, then to attend college, where he hopes to major in Business Administration. "I want to be an entrepreneur, and I want to be a teacher," he said.

PHILADELPHIA, May 22, 2006 - Community College of Philadelphia will hold a suppliers fair for minority and small business vendors from 9 a.m. to noon, Wednesday, June 7, in Room S 2-19 of the Winnet Student Life Building on 17th Street between Spring Garden and Callowhill streets.

Representatives of businesses owned by minorities, as well as small business owners are invited to attend and meet with college and university officials, who will have information tables at the event. Contact Karen-Beth Rynkewicz at 215-751-8900 to RSVP, if you are interested in attending.

At the fair, business owners will have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with facilities and information technology managers from the Philadelphia Area College Cooperative, which was formed by area higher education institutions to strengthen their collective buying power and promote their use of local businesses.

Purchasing managers from Community College of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, Princeton University, St. Joseph's University, La Salle University, Temple University and many other schools that are members of the cooperative are expected to participate.

Stephanie A. Watkins, the U.S. Small Business Administration's Region Three administrator, will be the guest speaker. Watkins oversees Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, D.C. and West Virginia. She is responsible for the financial assistance, business development and advocacy programs in her region.

Watkins will speak at 9:30 a.m. and be followed by the suppliers fair at 10:30 a.m.

Through the fair, Community College of Philadelphia seeks to afford small businesses and companies owned by minorities an opportunity to competitively bid on items that will be purchased by colleges and universities around the region. Some of the goods and services these colleges purchase include office supplies, instructional supplies, housekeeping supplies, computer accessories, security, roofing, construction and catering. Community College of Philadelphia spent nearly $32 million for goods and services in fiscal year 2004-2005.

PHILADELPHIA, PA, May 11, 2006- More than 1,500 students graduated from Community College of Philadelphia on Sunday, May 7, and many had poignant stories of triumph against the odds.

Sharrod Williams, 23, of Logan, sat proudly in the first row during the Commencement at Temple University's Liacouras Center. Despite having lost his arms and legs to bacterial meningitis in 1992, Williams graduated majoring in Business Administration. He now plans to attend Temple University's School of Business.

Sharrod credited the faculty at Community College of Philadelphia's Northwest campus, who he said became like a second family. "As a kid, I always wanted to go to college," he said. "Being able to come here and get a family helped me."

Asher Chavannes, 27, came to the United States in 1998 from Jamaica, where he lived in a poor household with a close-knit family and a mother who urged her children to get a good education. Sunday he became the first of his 12 siblings to graduate from college. He plans to attend LaSalle University for pre-medical studies, and he aspires to attend medical school at Columbia University.

Asher said he never dwelled on his impoverished family background, just on the goal ahead. "It was not easy, but wanting to succeed led me down that path," he said.

Dr. Alex Johnson, the chancellor of Delgado Community College in New Orleans and the keynote speaker at Commencement, praised the graduates for their hard work and urged them to give something back to society.

"Hurricane Katrina elicited the largest volunteer effort in the history of the United States," Dr. Johnson said, speaking of the hurricane that devastated New Orleans. "Do not think for one instant that your commitment to the community has been fulfilled. As citizens and residents of America, you have a responsibility to make our country a better place."

Collectively, community colleges around the nation donated $100,000 to Delgado, half of which came from student government associations at the colleges, according to Dr. Johnson. He also thanked Community College of Philadelphia for taking in four Delgado students and waiving their tuition.

Dr. Johnson called on the College's graduates to exercise the same selfless spirit in using their education to help society at large. "You have the power. You have the capacity and the obligation to undertake this work," he said. "Community College of Philadelphia has provided a foundation for your response to the challenges. Recognize your education can be used to serve society," said Johnson.

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest institution of higher education in Philadelphia and has served more than 540,000 people since it began operation in 1965. More than half of the College's graduates in transfer programs continue on to four-year institutions. The College also is ranked number four nationally in the number of associate's degrees awarded to African-American students, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

PHILADELPHIA, PA, May 11, 2006- More than 1,500 students graduated from Community College of Philadelphia on Sunday, May 7, and many had poignant stories of triumph against the odds.

Sharrod Williams, 23, of Logan, sat proudly in the first row during the Commencement at Temple University's Liacouras Center. Despite having lost his arms and legs to bacterial meningitis in 1992, Williams graduated majoring in Business Administration. He now plans to attend Temple University's School of Business.

Sharrod credited the faculty at Community College of Philadelphia's Northwest campus, who he said became like a second family. "As a kid, I always wanted to go to college," he said. "Being able to come here and get a family helped me."

Asher Chavannes, 27, came to the United States in 1998 from Jamaica, where he lived in a poor household with a close-knit family and a mother who urged her children to get a good education. Sunday he became the first of his 12 siblings to graduate from college. He plans to attend LaSalle University for pre-medical studies, and he aspires to attend medical school at Columbia University.

Asher said he never dwelled on his impoverished family background, just on the goal ahead. "It was not easy, but wanting to succeed led me down that path," he said.

Dr. Alex Johnson, the chancellor of Delgado Community College in New Orleans and the keynote speaker at Commencement, praised the graduates for their hard work and urged them to give something back to society.

"Hurricane Katrina elicited the largest volunteer effort in the history of the United States," Dr. Johnson said, speaking of the hurricane that devastated New Orleans. "Do not think for one instant that your commitment to the community has been fulfilled. As citizens and residents of America, you have a responsibility to make our country a better place."

Collectively, community colleges around the nation donated $100,000 to Delgado, half of which came from student government associations at the colleges, according to Dr. Johnson. He also thanked Community College of Philadelphia for taking in four Delgado students and waiving their tuition.

Dr. Johnson called on the College's graduates to exercise the same selfless spirit in using their education to help society at large. "You have the power. You have the capacity and the obligation to undertake this work," he said. "Community College of Philadelphia has provided a foundation for your response to the challenges. Recognize your education can be used to serve society," said Johnson.

Community College of Philadelphia is the largest institution of higher education in Philadelphia and has served more than 540,000 people since it began operation in 1965. More than half of the College's graduates in transfer programs continue on to four-year institutions. The College also is ranked number four nationally in the number of associate's degrees awarded to African-American students, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

PHILADELPHIA, PA, May 8, 2006 - Business owners and other people interested in helping provide a quality education to students at Community College of Philadelphia can make a donation and possibly score a hole-in-one at the Ninth Annual College Foundation golf tournament on Friday, May 12, at the Torresdale Frankford Country Club at Frankford and Grant Avenues.

Last year, more than 100 golfers participated. All proceeds from the event support student scholarships, equipment, faculty development and the advancement of methods to enhance the teaching and learning process.

To register for the golf tournament, send a check and registration form to Community College of Philadelphia Foundation, 1700 Spring Garden Street, Annex 7th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19130-3991. For more information and directions to the golf course, contact Elise Morgan at emorgan@ccp.edu or 215-751-8022 or fax 215-972-6299.

Registration at the golf course will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include a luncheon. There will be a shotgun start at 1 p.m.; hors d'oeuvres, cocktails and a silent auction at 6:30 p.m.; a buffet dinner, awards ceremony, and raffle drawing at 7 p.m.

Registration costs $295 per person and includes the luncheon, a round of golf, use of a golf cart, refreshments on the course, the cocktail hour and buffet dinner.

As of March 31, you can also bid in the first Community College of Philadelphia Foundation online auction by visiting www.CCPFoundationAuction.cmarket.com.

Among the items being auctioned are a Spirit of Philadelphia cruise for two, a lady's Tiffany sterling silver heart tag bracelet and a wine tasting kit from the world-renowned experts at Moore Brothers.

At the Web site, you can also bid on gift cards for everything from spa services to popular restaurants, premium cigars, signed and numbered art prints, as well as ways to pamper your favorite pooch, including massages, gifts and treats that say, "Good dog!"

The Foundation auction will run until May 15. You can participate by bidding on items, donating a product or service to the auction catalogue or by forwarding the auction Web address to family and friends.

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