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Congratulations to Kellie Brown, an office administrative associate in the Student Life Center, who has been named Employee of Month for March 2013.

Ban Wang, Ph.D., a National Endowment of the Humanities Distinguished Speaker, was the guest of the Center for International Understanding (CIU) on Feb. 11. About a dozen faculty attended Dr. Wang’s discussion of Chinese film director Zhang Yimou, who has two films exploring the exodus of the Chinese from the countryside to the cities. The Stanford University professor’s visit is part of a three-year National Endowment of the Humanities Project, organized by the Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP) of the East West Center/University of Hawaii. Shown, from left, are President Curtis, Dr. Ban Wang, CIU Director Dr. Fay Beauchamp, and Dr. Peter Hershock of the East-West Center and ASDP co-chair.

Byron Hurt

A screening of Byron Hurt’s "Soul Food Junkies" on Feb. 7 attracted approximately 300 viewers who gave the film exploring the history of soul food a “thumbs up.” Hurt’s documentary examines the positive and negative consequences of soul food traditions. Using candid interviews, Hurt also explores the link between socioeconomic conditions and diet in predominantly black neighborhoods. Lisa Handler, Ph.D., assistant professor of Social Science, helped organize the event, hosted by Independent Television Service Community Cinema. ITVS Community Cinema is a public education and civic engagement initiative featuring free monthly screenings of films shown on the weekly PBS series “Independent Lens.”

Larry G. Arrington, Jr

From time to time, Transcripts offers a glimpse into the life experiences of some of the new faces on campus. Larry G. Arrington, Jr., assistant dean of Educational Support Services, is one of the newer arrivals. Arrington has 12 years of experience at community colleges and eight years of experience in developmental education and student services. After undergraduate school, Larry enjoyed a brief chemical engineering career. But after reflecting upon the valuable support he received from the ACT 101 program at Drexel, he switched his focus to higher education and student support. The Philadelphia native has a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Drexel University and a Master of Education in Multicultural Education from Eastern University. Arrington previously worked at Delaware County Community College, Montgomery County Community College and Drexel University.

Front row, from left, Aaron Hill, Alyssa Shirey, Shannel Jones, Emeral Smith and Habitat construction manager Dan Jones. Back row, from left, Breana Shaw, Lise Benoit, Airika Volkova, chaperone Phil Wagner, George Pantelopulos, chaperone Diane Brisbon, Elena Lazarova and John Johnson.


Student volunteers George Pantelopulos and Shannel Jones


Students Airika Volkova and Lise Benoit

Come mid-summer, Ebony Pinckney and her son, Malachi, will move into their new house in North Charleston, S.C. Ebony, who works at a local hospital, will have room to spread out for once. And young Malachi, when not in school, will be able to play ball safely with friends in his own yard. This will be a richer life for the Pinckneys, thanks in part to Community College of Philadelphia students and staff who spent their Spring Break helping to construct that new home. Three groups of College volunteers—32 students plus chaperones—traveled to Charleston, S.C.; Gaffney, S.C.; and Battle Creek, Mich., as part of the Alternative Spring Break, March 2–9.

Team Charleston, which included 10 students, made the nearly 700-mile trip in two vans driven by chaperones Diane Brisbon, assistant professor of Counseling and Phil Wagner, a writer for Marketing and Government Relations. While in Charleston, the chaperones and students worked daily on the Pinckney house and slept on cots in a local church gymnasium. Brisbon says the experience of working side-by-side and living with students for a week was a departure from her usual interaction as a counselor and instructor. “I went because I enjoy interacting with the students and seeing them have new experiences,” she says. “It was exciting for me and rewarding.”

A panel of veteran news reporters shared their experiences covering breaking news about crime on Feb. 26. The discussion was among the highlights of the annual Fox Rothschild Law and Society Week, a series of workshops, lectures and entertainment which, this year, explored the role of 21st century technology in solving crimes and capturing lawbreakers. From left are Philadelphia Daily News columnist Stu Bykofsky, Michelle Durham of KYW News Radio, Jericka Duncan of CBS 3 Eyewitness News and Rosemary Connors of NBC10 News.

Descriptive Research Methods student Jenelle Noel presents survey results as part of the Sexting Project. Seated are Dr. Rick Frei, center, and students Riley McConnell, left, and Matt Modzelewski.

Rick Frei, Ph.D., makes certain that students in his Descriptive Research Methods class get to do just what the course title
says—apply the lessons learned in the classroom to describe behavior in large groups through survey development.

The class was created in 2007 to give students real-world experience in conducting research, says Dr. Frei, an associate professor in Behavioral Science. With Dr. Frei’s guidance, students completed and administered a city-wide survey on the Stop Snitchn' phenomenon and public perceptions about cooperating with police.

The College has since added an associate’s degree in Psychology, and that single class has grown to three sections with about 100 students, Dr. Frei says.

"The whole idea of the scientific method is that once you finish your research, you don’t just throw it into a drawer and walk away," Dr. Frei says. "Science is a process. The students present our findings at conferences and speak to after-school groups. The data from one class is used by subsequent classes to build a better theory."

Most recently, Dr. Frei’s students turned their attention to sexting, the act of sending sexually explicit messages and/or photographs, primarily between mobile phones. The practice is increasingly popular among teens and young adults. Dr. Frei had his students in the fall 2012 class review existing literature, develop a theory and hypothesis, and create the survey on sexting. Students in the spring 2013 class administered the survey to 1,020 people, analyzed the results, and presented the findings during this spring’s Fox Rothschild Law and Society Week.

Students found that respondents who sent the racy texts were more likely to have engaged in other risky sexual behavior such as unprotected sex, or sex under the influence of drugs or alcohol with a person and later regretted it. Philadelphia Daily News columnist Jenice Armstrong discussed the project’s findings on her blog on March 1.

Dr. Frei says the research experience provides students with valuable workplace skills. "This is something they can put on their résumés," he says.

PHILADELPHIA, April 1, 2013—NBC News Correspondent Bob Dotson has traveled over four million miles and been in more motel rooms than the Gideon Bible. The award-winning creator of the Today Show series, “The American Story with Bob Dotson,” will be the honored guest at the 2013 Kal and Lucille Rudman Media Seminar at 7 p.m., on Tuesday, April 9.

Dotson will share stories about the incredible people he has brought into homes via the show, discuss techniques for effective storytelling on television and preview his new book American Story, whichhighlights some of his favorite tales about the people who make this country great.

The annual event, at which Dotson will be introduced by NBC 10 News anchor Renee Chenault-Fattah, takes place at Community College of Philadelphia’s Large Auditorium in the Bonnell Building, located on 17th Street between Spring Garden and Callowhill Streets. The evening is designed to help students, educators and professionals explore issues in the news and meet people who shape contemporary media.

In a wide-ranging interview about his adventures in television news, Dotson will share his experiences about some of the most fascinating people he’s met as a reporter, including:

  • The boss who came out of retirement to start a new company for his former employees who couldn’t find work;
  • The truck driver who taught microsurgery; and
  • The man who has 465 profitable patents, second only to Thomas Edison

Dotson has crisscrossed the country for 40 years, spinning yarns and winning more than 100 awards for his work, including eight Emmys. He is considered one of the finest writers in broadcasting.

An Evening with Bob Dotson is sponsored by the Kal and Lucille Rudman Institute for Entertainment Industry Studies at the Westphal College of Media Arts and Design of Drexel University, by TUTV-Temple University Television/the Kal and Lucille Rudman Media Production Center at Temple University and CCPTV, the Educational Channel of Community College of Philadelphia.

There will be a book signing and reception following the conversation with Bob Dotson. The event is free and open to the public.

PHILADELPHIA, April 1, 2013—NBC News Correspondent Bob Dotson has traveled over four million miles and been in more motel rooms than the Gideon Bible. The award-winning creator of the Today Show series, “The American Story with Bob Dotson,” will be the honored guest at the 2013 Kal and Lucille Rudman Media Seminar at 7 p.m., on Tuesday, April 9.

Dotson will share stories about the incredible people he has brought into homes via the show, discuss techniques for effective storytelling on television and preview his new book American Story, whichhighlights some of his favorite tales about the people who make this country great.

The annual event, at which Dotson will be introduced by NBC 10 News anchor Renee Chenault-Fattah, takes place at Community College of Philadelphia’s Large Auditorium in the Bonnell Building, located on 17th Street between Spring Garden and Callowhill Streets. The evening is designed to help students, educators and professionals explore issues in the news and meet people who shape contemporary media.

In a wide-ranging interview about his adventures in television news, Dotson will share his experiences about some of the most fascinating people he’s met as a reporter, including:

  • The boss who came out of retirement to start a new company for his former employees who couldn’t find work;
  • The truck driver who taught microsurgery; and
  • The man who has 465 profitable patents, second only to Thomas Edison

Dotson has crisscrossed the country for 40 years, spinning yarns and winning more than 100 awards for his work, including eight Emmys. He is considered one of the finest writers in broadcasting.

An Evening with Bob Dotson is sponsored by the Kal and Lucille Rudman Institute for Entertainment Industry Studies at the Westphal College of Media Arts and Design of Drexel University, by TUTV-Temple University Television/the Kal and Lucille Rudman Media Production Center at Temple University and CCPTV, the Educational Channel of Community College of Philadelphia.

There will be a book signing and reception following the conversation with Bob Dotson. The event is free and open to the public.

PHILADELPHIA, March 21, 2013—Community College of Philadelphia is launching an initiative to identify and support the city’s Pathfinders, devoted community volunteers who work behind the scenes to help neighbors and first-generation college students get into and through college.

"Students sometimes enroll in college, then stop out or drop out as a result of life challenges," says Diane Kae, Manager, Community College of Philadelphia’s Student Outreach and Recruitment. "Some of our most successful students say they reached their goals because a neighbor, family member or stranger stepped forward to help them enroll, and prevent them from leaving college."

The College’s new Pathfinders initiative seeks to give these highly influential community leaders information, tools and resources in a more timely fashion, Kae said. "By meeting with them regularly, the College will be able to identify innovative practices and share them with our diverse community partners."

Christopher Thomas, an alumnus and single dad who now attends the University of Pennsylvania on scholarship, will be the featured speaker at the first Pathfinders event on April 8. The orientation session will be held from 5:15 p.m.—6:30 p.m. in the Welcome Center (P1-05), located in the Pavilion Building on 17th Street south of Spring Garden Street.

Thomas said a friend actually submitted his application to Community College of Philadelphia without his knowledge. He will talk to Pathfinders about the importance of community support and how that act of caring confidence transformed his life. The free Pathfinders training is open to individuals as well as to community-based organizations.

As part of this pilot program, Pathfinders will be encouraged to take on a number of critical tasks during 2013, among them: tutoring Philadelphia students preparing for the community college placement exams; bringing groups of first-generation college students to campus for free tours; explaining how financial aid systems work and identifying scholarships for students in need.

The College will host information sessions each semester for Pathfinders, and provide regular email updates that identity key areas where students are likely to falter, along with materials that address challenges they may face.

In today’s job market, college graduates have a jobless rate that is one-fourth that for high school graduates, a 2012 Georgetown University study found. On average people with a college degree earn 84 percent more over a lifetime than a high school graduates.

Individuals interested in joining the Pathfinders initiative or attending the orientation are asked to RSVP by contacting  Kae at dkae@ccp.edu

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