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PHILADELPHIA, August 20, 2013 – Community College of Philadelphia has joined the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and will compete in Region XIX this year as part of the Eastern Pennsylvania Athletic Conference (EPAC). The

NJCAA is the national governing body for two-year college athletics, covering junior college and community colleges nationwide.

Beginning with the 2013-14 season, the men‘s and women’s basketball, cross country, tennis and track and field teams will participate in the NJCAA.  “After being independent for the last year, it is exciting to belong to a league again,” said Athletic Director Rogers Glispy. “These teams now can participate in structured conferences, regional tournaments, and national championships.“

Men’s soccer and women’s volleyball will remain independent this year, but the Athletic Department is looking to add them to the NJCAA in subsequent seasons, Glispy said. “We have a long, winning tradition at the College over the years, taking multiple state and conference titles in all of our sports. We are looking forward to continuing our winning ways as part of the NJCAA”.

The men’s Colonials basketball team won six Pennsylvania Collegiate Athletic Association (PCAA) state championships—including the 2010 title and 25 Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Conference (EPCC) titles.

PHILADELPHIA, August 20, 2013 – Community College of Philadelphia has joined the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and will compete in Region XIX this year as part of the Eastern Pennsylvania Athletic Conference (EPAC). The NJCAA is the national governing body for two-year college athletics, covering junior college and community colleges nationwide.

Beginning with the 2013-14 season, the men‘s and women’s basketball, cross country, tennis and track and field teams will participate in the NJCAA.  “After being independent for the last year, it is exciting to belong to a league again,” said Athletic Director Rogers Glispy. “These teams now can participate in structured conferences, regional tournaments, and national championships.“

Men’s soccer and women’s volleyball will remain independent this year, but the Athletic Department is looking to add them to the NJCAA in subsequent seasons, Glispy said. “We have a long, winning tradition at the College over the years, taking multiple state and conference titles in all of our sports. We are looking forward to continuing our winning ways as part of the NJCAA”.

The men’s Colonials basketball team won six Pennsylvania Collegiate Athletic Association (PCAA) state championships—including the 2010 title and 25 Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Conference (EPCC) titles.

Ned Bachus , author of <em>The City of Brotherly Love</em>

Former faculty member Ned Bachus, author of The City of Brotherly Love, gave a workshop and talked with students as part of the Spring 2013 Poets and Writers’ Festival on Feb. 21. Bachus discussed writing techniques authors including himself use to develop characters through their location, such as Philadelphia.

 Karen E. Quinones Miller, author of <em> An Angry-Ass Black Woman</em></a>,

That afternoon, Karen E. Quinones Miller joined a panel of music producers and a choreographer as part of the day-long African-American Heritage Festival. Quinones Miller, a local favorite, signed copies of her latest novel, An Angry-Ass Black Woman, which is based on her life.

Julie Otsuka, author of <em>The Buddha in the Attic</em>

“One Book, One Philadelphia” author Julie Otsuka visited the campus on March 13 as the Spring 2013 Poets and Writers’ Festival continued. Otsuka discussed her novel, The Buddha in the Attic, which won the 2011 PEN/Faulkner Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award.

President Curtis, State Rep. Ron Waters, ACHIEVEability Board Chair Tom Flippen and outgoing ACHIEVEability CEO Marcus Allen at the annual Food for Thought gala. The College received the ACHIEVEability 2013 Commitment to Education Award.

ACHIEVEability has awarded the College with its prestigious Commitment to Education Award in recognition of services provided to the families participating in the nonprofit’s Family Self-Sufficiency Program.

The College is the first institution to receive the award, which usually goes to an individual outside the field of education. This year, however, ACHIEVEability decided to look beyond a single person, outgoing CEO Marcus Allen says. “Once we began looking, it was clear that Community College of Philadelphia has done more than any institution in helping educate our families,” he says.

Past Commitment to Education Award recipients include Dr. Ian Smith, former Gov. Ed Rendell, Mayor Michael A. Nutter, and comedian and activist Bill Cosby.

President Curtis accepted the award on behalf of the College at ACHIEVEability’s annual Food for Thought gala on March 23. The $200–a-ticket fundraising event was held at Urban Outfitter’s headquarters at the Navy Yard and featured more than 25 of the city’s top chefs and restaurants.

ACHIEVEability, founded in 1981, works with low-income, single-parent families to help them break the cycle of poverty. Participants in the Family Self-Sufficiency Program must complete at least five college classes a year toward a postsecondary degree or its equivalent. The College often is the most cost-effective option, according to Allen.

The College “understands the challenges and obstacles that our participants and families face, and has served them effectively,” says Allen. Over the past five years, 22 parents from ACHIEVEability have graduated from the College.

Suburban elementary school teacher Brenda Whiting is among the ACHIEVEability graduates. She completed her bachelor’s degree at Eastern University in 2009 and motivated her two daughters to become college graduates.

Elaina Howard, a social worker who received her master’s degree in Social Work from Temple University in January, is another success story. Howard was a student at the College facing homelessness when she entered the ACHIEVEability program. She received an associate’s degree in 2007 and transferred to La Salle University.

Currently, 51 ACHIEVEability participants are taking classes at the College.

 Gold Fit-Friendly Worksite by the American Heart Association

The College has been designated as a Gold Fit-Friendly Worksite by the American Heart Association for recognizing the importance of a healthy workplace and creating a culture of wellness at the institution. The award commended the College for such activities as the National Walking Day event on April 3. Agnes Trummer, director of Benefits, organized a group of College employees, shown above, to take part in the Walking Day event.

Student speaker Maria Morreto  John Braxton, assistant professor, Biology; and Cynthia Reid, an administrative associate in Financial Aid, and Patricia Noel-Reid, an accounting clerk in the Bursar’s Office.

Maria Morrero, an Honors student at the College, galvanizes a crowd of community college students, administrators and state lawmakers April 9 in the Capitol Rotunda in Harrisburg. Morrero was selected to represent students at the state’s 14 community colleges at a Lobby Day rally seeking state funding for operating and capital budgets. With support from the Faculty and Staff Federation of Community College of Philadelphia, 71 students, faculty and administrators joined colleges from around the state in a campaign to remind state legislators that their support is important to tens of thousands of students.

 

Student chef Wadiya Moore won this year’s NBC10 Local Chef competition this May, which for the first time featured students from the College’s Culinary Arts program. The competition aired during the 11 a.m. news on Tuesdays between April 30 and May 21. Moore out-cooked five fellow students for the title and the opportunity to appear in two video segments that aired before the start of “Access Hollywood” on May 30 and June 6. The cook-off was held in the College’s new professional-grade kitchens under the eyes of a panel of judges that included chefs Patrice Rames of Bistro St. Tropez; Patrick Feury of Nectar Restaurant; and Andres Marin, a Culinary Arts instructor. You can watch the Access Hollywood segments here.

You can watch the College’s Culinary Arts students compete here.

Community College of Philadelphia mourns the passing of its founding and first President Allen T. Bonnell, Ph.D., a champion of education who died at 101 years old on Saturday, July 20.  He was a resident of the White Horse Village, a retirement community in Newtown Square.

Dr. Bonnell was a leader who sought to “democratize” higher education through public support and open access policies. He spearheaded the development of Community College of Philadelphia by leading an extensive research effort resulting in the creation of the Philadelphia Committee on Higher Educational Opportunities in 1957 and a proposal for a Philadelphia community college in 1962. He retired on Aug. 31, 1983, and has been president emeritus of College since 1993.

Thanks to Dr. Bonnell’s vision and determination, the College has since served more than 630,000 people and is Philadelphia’s only public institution of higher education. Pennsylvania was the 44th state to authorize the creation of a community college system in August 1963. Two years later, the first board of trustees selected Dr. Bonnell to head the College. His credentials were ideal. He had spent the previous 17 years as a senior administrator at Drexel Institute of Technology, now Drexel University.

There were many doubters that the new two-year institution would succeed in opening its doors on time, let alone accomplish its ambitious mission. Dr. Bonnell proved them all wrong. The College opened as scheduled on Sept. 23, 1965, to 1,200 students and Dr. Bonnell was there to greet them amid the sound of hammers and the dust of ongoing construction in the converted Snellenburg Department Store at 11th and Market streets. Under his leadership, the College blossomed. By fall 1967, enrollments reached nearly 5,000.

As the College continued to grow, Dr. Bonnell embarked on a 17-year search for a larger more permanent home. In 1971, he secured the historic federal Mint Building as the center of what has become the College’s Main Campus at 17th and Spring Garden streets. When he retired in August 1983 at the age of 72, the number of programs had grown from the initial five to 52. The College had achieved national recognition for its multifaceted approach to addressing the educational needs of academically disadvantaged students.

Josie DiGregorio, who has served as executive assistant for all five of the College’s Presidents, said Dr. Bonnell held a special place in her heart. “In helping to create the College, Dr. Bonnell gave the city and its residents a gift that is beyond price,” she said. She recalls him as “an intellectual but at the same time a very humble individual. He was a really wonderful human being who loved this College and the opportunity it represented.”

DiGregorio attended Dr. Bonnell’s 100th birthday party in April 2012 and spoke with him in recent months. “His body was failing, but his mind was still sharp as ever,” DiGregorio said. “It remained so until the end.”

Thanks to the firm foundation established by Dr. Bonnell, the College now offers nearly 90 degree and certificate programs with an annual enrollment of nearly 40,000 students at its Main Campus and three regional centers in Northeast, Northwest and West Philadelphia.

In recognition of Dr. Bonnell’s service, the College named one of its major buildings on its Main Campus in his honor. It also created the annual Bonnell Award, given in recognition civic and business leaders for exemplary community service and a commitment to access, opportunity and transformational change.

Dr. Bonnell received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees from Oberlin College. He attended the University of Bonn in Germany and earned a doctorate in Economics degree from University of Illinois in 1937.He also received an honorary Litt.D. degree from Drexel University in 1969. He taught at the University of Illinois, St. Louis University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Except for leaves of absence during World War II, Dr. Bonnell made his professional career in higher education.

In the early 1950s, Dr. Bonnell was a member of a small group, under the leadership of Dr. W. Laurence LePage, president of The Franklin Institute, which obtained the original charter for the Metropolitan Educational Radio and Television Corporation. He served as a member of the board of directors for that corporation and its eventual successor, WHYY Inc.

He is survived by his children, Thomas H. Bonnell, David W. Bonnell, Ann Maiocco, and was pre-deceased by his son Daniel C Bonnell. He also is survived by his four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A family spokeswoman said many of the family members were away and that a memorial service is planned for the fall.

Meanwhile, the College has created a memorial web page where members of the College Family and others can share their thoughts and memories about Dr. Bonnell at: http://www.ccp.edu/site/about/allen-bonnell.php.

PHILADELPHIA, July 25, 2013—Community College of Philadelphia mourns the passing of its founding and first President Allen T. Bonnell, Ph.D., a champion of education who died at 101 years old on Saturday, July 20.  He was a resident of the White Horse Village, a retirement community in Newtown Square.

Dr. Bonnell was a leader who sought to “democratize” higher education through public support and open access policies. He spearheaded the development of Community College of Philadelphia by leading an extensive research effort resulting in the creation of the Philadelphia Committee on Higher Educational Opportunities in 1957 and a proposal for a Philadelphia community college in 1962. He retired on Aug. 31, 1983, and has been president emeritus of College since 1993.

Thanks to Dr. Bonnell’s vision and determination, the College has since served more than 630,000 people and is Philadelphia’s only public institution of higher education. Pennsylvania was the 44th state to authorize the creation of a community college system in August 1963. Two years later, the first board of trustees selected Dr. Bonnell to head the College. His credentials were ideal. He had spent the previous 17 years as a senior administrator at Drexel Institute of Technology, now Drexel University.

There were many doubters that the new two-year institution would succeed in opening its doors on time, let alone accomplish its ambitious mission. Dr. Bonnell proved them all wrong. The College opened as scheduled on Sept. 23, 1965, to 1,200 students and Dr. Bonnell was there to greet them amid the sound of hammers and the dust of ongoing construction in the converted Snellenburg Department Store at 11th and Market streets. Under his leadership, the College blossomed. By fall 1967, enrollments reached nearly 5,000.

As the College continued to grow, Dr. Bonnell embarked on a 17-year search for a larger more permanent home. In 1971, he secured the historic federal Mint Building as the center of what has become the College’s Main Campus at 17th and Spring Garden streets. When he retired in August 1983 at the age of 72, the number of programs had grown from the initial five to 52. The College had achieved national recognition for its multifaceted approach to addressing the educational needs of academically disadvantaged students.

Josie DiGregorio, who has served as executive assistant for all five of the College’s Presidents, said Dr. Bonnell held a special place in her heart. “In helping to create the College, Dr. Bonnell gave the city and its residents a gift that is beyond price,” she said. She recalls him as “an intellectual but at the same time a very humble individual. He was a really wonderful human being who loved this College and the opportunity it represented.”

DiGregorio attended Dr. Bonnell’s 100th birthday party in April 2012 and spoke with him in recent months. “His body was failing, but his mind was still sharp as ever,” DiGregorio said. “It remained so until the end.”

Thanks to the firm foundation established by Dr. Bonnell, the College now offers nearly 90 degree and certificate programs with an annual enrollment of nearly 40,000 students at its Main Campus and three regional centers in Northeast, Northwest and West Philadelphia.

In recognition of Dr. Bonnell’s service, the College named one of its major buildings on its Main Campus in his honor. It also created the annual Bonnell Award, given in recognition civic and business leaders for exemplary community service and a commitment to access, opportunity and transformational change.

Dr. Bonnell received his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees from Oberlin College. He attended the University of Bonn in Germany and earned a doctorate in Economics degree from University of Illinois in 1937.He also received an honorary Litt.D. degree from Drexel University in 1969. He taught at the University of Illinois, St. Louis University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Except for leaves of absence during World War II, Dr. Bonnell made his professional career in higher education.

In the early 1950s, Dr. Bonnell was a member of a small group, under the leadership of Dr. W. Laurence LePage, president of The Franklin Institute, which obtained the original charter for the Metropolitan Educational Radio and Television Corporation. He served as a member of the board of directors for that corporation and its eventual successor, WHYY Inc.

He is survived by his children, Thomas H. Bonnell, David W. Bonnell, Ann Maiocco, and was pre-deceased by his son Daniel C Bonnell. He also is survived by his four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A family spokeswoman said many of the family members were away and that a memorial service is planned for the fall.

Meanwhile, the College has created a memorial web page where members of the College Family and others can share their thoughts and memories about Dr. Bonnell at:  http://www.ccp.edu/site/about/allen-bonnell.php.

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