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Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Rhonda L. Lipschutz, 215-751-8021, rlipschutz@ccp.edu

WHAT: Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church is a strong supporter of higher education and is committed to making sure every Philadelphia public high school student can attend college. At its Sunday service on April 16, Enon is stepping forward to support Community College of Philadelphia’s 50th Anniversary Scholars Program. Enon will provide an offering at the service. Funds from the offering will go toward the 50th Anniversary Scholars Program.  

The 50th Anniversary Scholars Program’s ultimate goal is to ensure that any Philadelphia high school graduate who wants to go to college is able to do so. Established in 2015, in response to the White House’s American College Promise proposal, this program enables college-ready, Pell eligible Philadelphia high school graduates to attend the Community College of Philadelphia with no out-of-pocket cost for tuition and fees. Since its inception two years ago, the 50th Anniversary Scholars Program has awarded $374,586 to incoming freshman.

WHO: Reverend Dr. Alyn E. Waller, Senior Pastor
Dr. Ellyn Jo Waller, the leader of Enon’s Women’s Ministry and a member of the Community College of Philadelphia Foundation
Dr. Donald Generals, President of Community College of Philadelphia
A congregation of about 7,000

WHEN: Sunday, April 16, 2017  
8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. (Media Interviews)

WHERE: 2800 W. Cheltenham Avenue on Sunday April 16, 2017

 

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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu
Rhonda L. Lipschutz, 215-751-8021, rlipschutz@ccp.edu


The Automotive Technology Program at Community College of Philadelphia to Participate in 2017 National Fuel Vehicle Odyssey Event 

WHAT: The automotive industry is becoming more diverse with the introduction of alternative fuel vehicles, such as hybrids and electric vehicles (EV). As more urban populations have an interest in purchasing these vehicles, the demand for auto technicians trained in alternative fuels will be needed. To train those in the automotive field, and for anyone interested in starting a career in the industry, the Automotive Technology Program at Community College of Philadelphia will participate in a nationwide effort to showcase alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicle options at a National Alternative Fuel Vehicle Odyssey event.  

Select area high school students, college students, automotive technicians, service personnel and the general public are invited to attend the Odyssey event. The day will include lectures and workshops from professionals in the automotive tech field. Participants will be broken up into student groups where they can meet with speakers.

WHO:  Guest speakers and panel topics include:

Daniel Reed, Community College of Philadelphia, Auto Technology Program – Hybrid and EV Safety Precautions
Tony Bandiero, Eastern Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Transportation – Alternative Fuels Facts, and Infrastructure in Our Region
Joe Torchiana, Torchiana Automotive Training – CNG/Propane Conversions and Vehicle Safety

WHEN: Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. To register, go to Community College of Philadelphia

WHERE: Community College of Philadelphia, West Regional Center, 4731 Ludlow Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19139

VISUALS: Various alternative fuel vehicles, including EVs, charge systems and hybrids will be on display, dozens of students learning hands-on training about the alternative fuels industry.


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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu


Philadelphia, April 31, 2017---As the nation’s first World Heritage City, Philadelphia prides itself on global engagement and global citizenship. Community College of Philadelphia continuously builds upon those civic and cultural values, and this week it is inviting the City to join in during its 33rd Annual International Festival, which will be April 3-10.

The festival began largely as a celebration of food, dance and culture, but over the years it has broadened to integrate lectures on current affairs and integrate events with classroom-based activities. This year’s theme, “Identity within a Global Citizenry” touches upon many timely topics in the news, such as political changes in Cuba and the Middle East; refugees and immigration.

With the goal of developing an informed citizenry, faculty have broadened the scope of educational opportunities by connecting lectures with classrooms and using the dialog to engage students in the study of world history, languages, and more.

For example, Tanzania and Cuba are central topics at this year’s festival. Over the summer, groups of students and faculty from the College will study abroad in those countries, learning about the history, culture and more. “I would like to emphasize this College has been a national leader in winning and using federal grants to internationalize our college,” said Dr. Fay Beauchamp, who is the College’s director for the Center for International Understanding.

Students benefit from the grants, as the curricula has become internationalize, Dr. Beauchamp said, and classes have been added and programs enriched. As a result, the College now offers an array of language classes in Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Swahili and courses focused on different world areas.

The International Festival Luncheon will kick off the week with a keynote address from the City Solicitor for Philadelphia, Sozi Pedro Tulante, who will discuss immigration and reflect upon current events. Tulante, who immigrated to Philadelphia in 1983 as a political refugee, from the Democratic Republic of Congo (Zaire); manages 300 staff in the Philadelphia Law Department, and represents the City in all lawsuits. Although RSVPs for the Luncheon are now closed, a plethora of other events will be open to the public to attend.

On Friday, the social activist Hip Hop Duo Obsesion from Havana, Cuba, will showcase their work as activist artists. Alexey Rodriguez Mola and Magia Lopez Cabrera, the founding members of Obsesion, will discuss their role in the hip hop movement in Cuba since the 1990s. The event starts at 11:30 AM April 7, in the Great Hall of the Winnet Student Life Building, Room S2-19.

Additional newsworthy events include the following:

  • Reception and Lecture to Celebrate 2016 and 2017 Title VI Tanzania Study Abroad students and faculty: The reception will recognize the contributions of Dr. Richard Mshomba, Professor of Economics at LaSalle University. Dr. Mshomba will also lead a lecture titled “From Social Activist Rhetoric to Independence and Unity: The Case of Julius Nyerere and Tanzania.” Monday, April 3, 5:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building
  • Understanding Middle Eastern Cultures and Contemporary Life: Dr. Beauchamp; Professor Soad Shindy, Arabic instructor at the College; and Ms. Simaa Amin— will lead conversations focused on Islamic traditions and beliefs and social justice associated with the culture both in the Middle East and the United States. Tuesday, April 4, 9:40 a.m. to 12:40 p.m., Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building
  • Fair Trade Chocolate and the Need to End Forced Child Labor in the International Chocolate Industry: Students from the International Student Association (ISA), alongside Professor Ari Bank, will lead a presentation and discussion focusing on fair trade chocolate, and strategies to eliminate global forced child labor. Tuesday, April 4, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., Room C2-28, Center for Business and Industry
  • Taste the World Event: Experience a variety of tastes and flavors from around the world prepared by the students in the Culinary Arts & Hospitality Management program. Wednesday, April 5, 11:00 a.m. to 1:00p.m., Pavilion Building, 2nd Floor
  • South Asian Dance Performance: Siddhendra Kuchipudi Art Academy which promotes India's cultural heritage by teaching and performing Kuchipudi, a South Indian classical dance form, will perform with their Founder and Artistic Director Swathi Atluri (Gundapuneedi). Wednesday, April 5, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., BG-20, Bonnell Building
  • Japan Fishermen’s Dance and Cultural Explanations: Professor Akiko Mori, Instructor of Japanese, and many of her students will perform Soran Bushi, one of Japan’s most famous traditional songs with a dance. Between performances Professor Mori will explain the significance and history of the various “Fishermen’s Dances.” Wednesday, April 5, 12:40 a.m. to 1:40 p.m., BG-20, Bonnell Building
  •  International Festival Cultural Show: The annual Show demonstrates the appreciation of the diverse traditions of students at Community College of Philadelphia. Hosted by the founder of the College’s International Festival—Dr. Pairat Sethbhakdi, and Swahili language instructor Beatrice Bolger and her Swahili 101 students. Wednesday, April 5, 1:50 a.m. to 2:50 p.m., BG-20, Bonnell Building
  • Obsesion—Women’s Rights and Social Concerns in Cuba: Talk and Discussion: Obsesion will discuss how the hip hop movements relates to their Afro-Cuban communities focusing on women’s rights, the Afro-Cuban culture, and their struggles with race relations. Friday, April 7, 12:40 p.m.-1:40 p.m., Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building

 

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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu


PHILADELPHIA, Pa. March 28 -- Community College of Philadelphia this week purchased land from a benefactor that will enable it to expand and improve the Automotive Technology Program, which is located in the West Philadelphia Promise Zone, and operating at capacity with a 100 percent job placement rate.

The College acquired the .63 acres of land below market value from long-time West Philadelphia Businessman Daniel Veloric and the Daniel Veloric Foundation. The funds for the purchase was provided by the Community College of Philadelphia Foundation. The Foundation used funds designated for capital projects. The parcel is adjacent to the College’s current Automotive Technology facility at 4735 Ludlow Street, near 48thstreet.

With this donation, Veloric, a successful entrepreneur who started more than 15 operating companies in fields ranging from financial-management services and medical supplies to health care, fulfills his longtime dream for West Philadelphia, a neighborhood in which he has invested for much of his career. His philanthropy will support a program that enables residents of West Philadelphia to acquire in-demand skills that lead to jobs and community prosperity.

“We are extremely pleased about this acquisition,” said Dr. Donald Generals, president of the College. “Our students are in high-demand across the region with many getting jobs long before they graduate, The market research found there aren’t currently enough training opportunities to meet the needs of area employers. This expansion is especially noteworthy because it will occur within the West Philadelphia Promise Zone and offer a fast-track to employment.”

“You know what youth can do with education because you did it,” Verloric said to Dr. Generals at the deed signing on Monday, noting the president’s humble upbringings in a working-class neighborhood in Paterson, New Jersey. “I want to give everybody an opportunity. Education is a slam dunk.”

The College, which currently has 120 students in the Automotive Technology Program, expects to begin construction on the $15 to $18 million project in early 2018, once financing is in place. When the 37,000 square-foot facility is completed the Automotive Technology Program will double its enrollment capacity

and have sufficient space to offer training related to diesel cars and trucks and alternative fuel vehicles. The current 10,000 square-foot facility will be demolished.

The Automotive Technology Program provides students with the opportunity to develop both technical and business skills in automotive maintenance and repair, as well as in automotive management, marketing and sales. About 70 percent of the training is hands-on. It enrolls about 80 students each semester.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2015 median salary for an automotive technician was $37, 850. Employers today prefer that technicians and mechanics complete a formal education training at a post-secondary institution, the labor bureau said. Between 2014-2024, 39,000 new auto tech jobs are expected to be created.

The program at the College is extremely competitive. This year Kaomi Adjonki, a student in the automotive technician program, won best poster presentation at the largest Transportation conference in the world, Transportation Research Board. He became the first community college student to ever be awarded this honor, competing against students in programs earning bachelor, master and doctorate degrees.


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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu

 

Philadelphia, PA. - The story of the engineer from India driving a taxicab, or the nurse from Mexico working as a nanny— has become all too familiar. Foreign-educated immigrants often struggle to find jobs in this country that match their prior education and experience obtained in their home country. An estimated 2.7 million college-educated immigrants in this country are unemployed or under-employed, according to the Migration Policy Institute. Now the Institute for Community Engagement and Civic Leadership at Community College of Philadelphia is teaming up with Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians, World Education Services (WES) and the Community College Consortium for Immigrant Education (CCCIE) to address this problem.

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and Donald Guy Generals, president of Community College of Philadelphia, will speak at the event, Pathways to Success for Immigrants, which will be held at Community College of Philadelphia (1700 Spring Garden Street, Winnet Student Life Building – Great Hall, (Room S2-19) on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 from 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. Guests can RSVP to institute@ccp.edu.

The program will provide information and resources to help skilled immigrants pursue further education, obtain professional licensing or certification, and find suitable employment in the U.S. The event is free, and is open to all current and recent immigrant students; as well as community residents who may want guidance on steps to take in order to move into their area of training. College and community-area counselors and socials services staff who work with immigrants, will also learn how they can advise their clients more effectively.

With over 30,000 students and more than 1,400 faculty, administrative and support staff, Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College offers over 70 degree and certificate programs, as well as evening and weekend classes, and classes online. It’s new Institute for Community Engagement and Civic Leadership, which is a sponsor, seeks to foster a culture of engagement and collaboration that promotes experiential learning and capitalizes on the strengths of students, faculty, staff and partners to make an impact social justice issues.

The Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians was founded in 2003 and its mission is to accelerate immigrant integration through education, training, employment and entrepreneurship. To date, the organization has helped more than 15,000 people from 140 countries around the world connect to opportunity in the Philadelphia region.

World Education Services is an accredited non-profit organization with over 30 years’ experience evaluating foreign credentials so they are understood and fully recognized in the U.S. The Global Talent Bridge initiative helps skilled immigrants fully utilize their talents and education in the U.S. and provides technical assistance and resources to organizations that advise highly qualified immigrants.

Community College Consortium for Immigrant Education is a national network of community colleges and other organizations committed to expanding and strengthening programs for immigrant students at community colleges nationwide. Activities include: raising visibility of immigrant education issues, sharing best practices, and advocacy. Palm Beach State College is a member of CCCIE.

 

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu

WHO: Community College of Philadelphia with over 30,000 students and more than 1,400 faculty, administrative and support staff.

WHAT: Community College of Philadelphia will commemorate its new smoke-free initiative during Kick Butts Day, a national platform to raise awareness about youth smoking.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 15, 2017, 12 to 2 p.m.

WHERE: Community College of Philadelphia, Bonnell Building Lobby, 1700 Spring Garden Street

DETAILS: In January, students at Community College of Philadelphia became the largest smoke-free student population in Philadelphia. The college will hold a resource fair, which joins more than 1,000 events occurring worldwide, in recognition of Kick Butts Day – an initiative organized by Tobacco-Free Kids.

The campus resource fair will highlight the harmful consequences of smoking and offer students and staff smoking cessation resources. There will be a particular focus on smoking’s effects on the brain in conjunction with National Brain Awareness Week.

Employees from human resources, the office of student affairs, the psychology department, allied health, the counseling department, and the Veterans Resources Center along with the City of Philadelphia Department of Public Health and other organizations will be on hand to support participants in kicking their smoking habits. Students and staff members will have an opportunity to win either a $100 Visa gift card or a FitBit when they submit their “I quit smoking” stories. All story submissions will be posted on the college’s no-smoking webpage, under the EX-Smokers Hall of Fame Gallery.

 

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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.



Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu


PHILADELPHIA (Feb. 23, 2017) —The 18th Annual Law and Society Week (February 27 – March 3) at Community College of Philadelphia offers workshops, screenings and lectures that will examine some of society’s most pressing – and, sometimes, controversial issues, through a legal lens. This year, the College is shining a light on the issue of juvenile justice, which has taken on a new sense of urgency in Pennsylvania.

In the aftermath of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to end the practice of life without parole, juvenile lifers must have their cases resentenced. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has 500 juvenile lifers, 300 of whom are from Philadelphia. To explore, both the legalities and the human impact, Adjunct Professor Don Haldeman will hold a community workshop in a traditional peacemaking circle. The session, called “Perspectives on Healing in the Aftermath of Violence: A Restorative Justice Peace Circle,” will explore the aftermath of violence and what to do about healing. Among the participants will be families who have lost loved ones to violent crimes, as well as relatives of offenders. The discussion will take place on Tuesday, February 28, 2017, 1-2:30 p.m. at the Center for Business Industry in room C2-5.

This year, the week includes a very special event “Community Law School Day,” which spotlights the everyday legal issues faced by Philadelphians. Participants will learn about child custody; rental housing law and their rights as a tenant; representing themselves in court; dealing with the police and understanding their rights; cutting through red tape when interacting with bureaucracies to get public benefits and services; finding legal help and more. Legal clinics will offer assistance with child support issues, criminal record expungement assessment, tax preparation; and Individualized Education Program review and development. Pre-registration is sold out, but walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. Co-sponsored by Community Legal Services and Philadelphia Legal Assistance, with contributions from the ACLU of Pennsylvania, Clarifi, PathWays PA and the PEAL Center.

“When people see how law relates to the technology they use, the food they eat, and just about

every topic imaginable, that’s a real light bulb moment for them,” explains Kathleen M. Smith, J.D., director of the Fox Rothschild Center for Law and Society, who launched Law and Society Week with husband David Freeman J.D., an associate professor of Social Science at the College.

Law and Society Week is a series of lectures, panel discussions, workshops and interactive activities designed to inform students and the general public of emerging legal issues and trends; while providing practical advice from experts. More than two dozen workshops, lectures, panel discussions, and demonstrations during the week are free and open to the public and attorneys.

Some of the Law and Society Week lectures qualify for Continuing Legal Education credits for legal professionals. To learn how to receive continuing education credits, contact LawCenter@ccp.edu

Among the newsworthy sessions this year:

➢ Youth, Punishment and Crime: Sentencing and Reentry: This panel focuses on ways to transform the experiences of children prosecuted in the adult criminal justice system; and to ensure fair and thoughtful resentencing and reentry for juvenile lifers, or individuals who were sentenced to life without parole as children. Joanna Visser Adjoian, director, Youth Sentencing and Reentry Project (YSRP) will present. *1.5 hours Substantive CLE. Thursday, March 2, 9:40 a.m. to 11:10 a.m., Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

➢ Opiate Addiction: Why the Increase, and What Can We Do About It?: An estimated 2.1 million people in the United States suffer from substance use disorders related to prescription opioid pain relievers. This addiction can affect the health, social, and economic welfare of all involved, with unintentional overdose deaths soaring since 1999. This panel will discuss the science of addiction, explain the rapid increase we have seen in recent years and offer suggestions to reduce death rates. Learn how guidelines for prescriptions have changed, and what the DEA is doing about this epidemic. *1 hour Substantive CLE. Wednesday, March 1, 10:20 a.m. to 11:20 a.m. Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building

➢ Domestic Violence: Do You Hear Me? A Symphony of Hope: A multimedia presentation including a song, panel and a skit will tackle the many facets of domestic violence. This session will also include a presentation by William Love, Esq. on protection from abuse standards and provide an opportunity for discussion. *1.5 hours Substantive CLE. Tuesday, February 28, 11:20 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20

➢ International Human Trafficking: Human trafficking is considered one of the fastest growing criminal industries in the world. Where most people think that this activity does not impact them personally, different forms of forced labor have been uncovered throughout the United States and abroad. The efforts to stop and understand the networks of Human Trafficking at home and abroad are immense -- using everyday individuals to help authorities pursue trafficking situations with simple apps has become commonplace. CCP Assistant Professor Deirdre Garrity-Benjamin will delve into how GIS and law professional are exposing human trafficking at home and abroad. On the surface, chocolate is a readily available and delicious

treat, but there is a dark side to chocolate-one that involves the trafficking of children, especially in West Africa. Join us for an eye-opening discussion, with anthropologist Donna Gottardi, on the world of human trafficking- specifically the trafficking of children, in our quest for cheap chocolate. Donna was first exposed to these problems during her world travels and has made it a passion to educate the public about this “dark world”, but also to provide a solution through the selling of fair trade chocolates. This powerful discussion will leave you educated on one of our favorite treats. Presenters: Donna Gottardi, Owner of My Fair Trade Lady, Haddon Height NJ; Deirdre Garrity-Benjamin- Assistant Professor Environmental Conservation, Geography and GIS. Moderators: Nicole Vadino and Faye Allard, Ph.D., assistant professors, Sociology. *1 hour Substantive CLE. Monday, February 27, 10:20 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

➢ Life and Death with Dignity: A Conversation with Barbara Mancini: Barbara Mancini is a registered nurse whose yearlong prosecution by former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane for allegedly aiding the attempted suicide of her father by handing him pain medication made national news. Ms. Mancini became an activist for Death with Dignity as a result, and her story has been told on “60 Minutes” and CNN. This session features a discussion of her story and a consideration of important end-of-life issues. *1.5 hours Substantive CLE. Monday, February 27, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building

A number of free activities are also planned: A demonstration of a youth court, featuring Philadelphia school students on Wednesday, March 1, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; and a performance of a collection of monologues and scenes written by students from the REACH Program of the College’s Reentry Support Project on Monday, February 27, 1:40 to 2:40 p.m. Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20

This year, Law and Society week will close with the screening of the documentary 13th, followed by an expert panel discussion led by Keir Bradford-Grey of the Defender’s Office of Philadelphia on Friday, March 3, 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20. *1 hour Substantive CLE.

For a full schedule of events, visit: www.ccp.edu/law-week

 

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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.


Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu

 

PHILADELPHIA (Feb. 23, 2017) — Over the years, Law and Society Week at Community College of Philadelphia has confronted issues of social justice and embraced civic engagement. This year, as thousands of Americans take to the streets in marches and protests, social change is a hotly debated topic, with renewed emphasis on children and young people as game changers.

One of the Law and Society Week panels looks at Children as Change Makersand explores the characteristics of youth who effectuate meaningful change in society. Mary Beth Tinker, an eighth grader who protested the Vietnam War by wearing a black armband to school, will be among the panelists. Her activism led to the 1969 case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District Supreme Court case, which defined free speech rights of juveniles. Alexis Werner, who started the nonprofit Seeds of Hope as a high school student, also will join the panel. Alexis created the nonprofit to help better understand and assist her father and others upon on their return from Afghanistan. David Trevaskis, Esq. Pro Bono Counsel of the Pennsylvania Bar Association, will serve as moderator. The program will be held from 2:40 p.m. to 4:10 p.m. Tuesday, February 28, 2017 in the Winnet Student Life Building (Great Hall, Room S2-19).

Additionally, an evening panel will explore the legal framework of the Tinker case more deeply. Titled The First Amendment Gets Personal: The Tinker Case, panelists include the Hon. Theodore McKee, judge in the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and David Trevaskis, Esq., Pro Bono Counsel, Pennsylvania Bar Association, who will moderate the dialog. The event will take place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, February 28, 2017 in the Winnet Student Life Building (Great Hall, Room S2-19).

Youth transformation also is the theme of a third panel, Savage Inequities: A Tale of Two Schools. It will examine how school inequity affects youth, and rich and poor communities alike. The panel explores the lessons gleaned from a bus trip that students from Philadelphia’s Kensington Health Science High School took to Montgomery County’s Methacton High School to experience life at a wealthy, suburban high school for a day. The exchange opened eyes and hearts in unexpected ways. Anthony Maida, a teacher at Methacton, and James Williams,

Principal at Kensington Health Science will go beyond statistics and share how the experience changed perspectives for both groups. David Trevaskis will moderate. The panel will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday, February 27 in the Center for Business and Industry (Room C2-28).

Law & Society Week spotlights emerging legal issues and trends in Philadelphia while providing practical advice from respected experts. More than two dozen workshops, lectures, panel discussions and demonstrations during the week are free and open to the public and attorneys. “When people see how law relates to the technology they use, the food they eat, and just about every topic imaginable, that’s a real light bulb moment for them,” explains Kathleen M. Smith, J.D., director of the Fox Rothschild Center of Law and Society, who launched Law and Society Week with husband David Freeman J.D., an associate professor of Social Science at the College.

Some of the Law and Society Week lectures qualify for Continuing Legal Education credits for legal professionals. To learn how to receive continuing education credits, contact LawCenter@ccp.edu

Among the other newsworthy sessions this year:

  • Answering the Call for Political Renewal: Many voters have lost faith in the ability of our political process to govern this country. What reforms should be on the agenda, locally and nationally, to restore that faith and the sense that democracy can work again? What can individuals do to help bring about those changes? David Thornburgh of the Committee of Seventy leads the panel. Thursday, March 2, 11:20 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20, Bonnell Building
  • Promoting Intellectual Diversity in an Inclusive Environment: The Supreme Court has yet to rule directly on whether speech codes on college campuses violate the First Amendment. This panel will explore the boundaries of intellectual discourse on campuses and the concept of promoting a safe space for the free market of ideas. Wednesday, March 1, 9 to 10:20 a.m. Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building
  • Marijuana Law: What’s the Future? A panel will look at the state of laws on marijuana and discuss upcoming changes for Pennsylvania in the emerging medical marijuana and industrial hemp markets on Thursday, March 2, 6 to 7:30 p.m. Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building
  • Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto, Civil Rights and Legal Challenges: Octavius Catto was a renaissance man and civil rights activist who was murdered on Election Day, as he worked for voting rights. This spring, the City plans to unveil a memorial statue dedicated to Catto on the southwest apron of City Hall – the first African American individual so honored. Authors Dan Biddle and Murray Dubin will discuss their book, Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto and the Battle for Equality in Civil War America. This session will include discussions of the 1859 trial of a fugitive slave, legal battles over streetcar access and voting rights and related legal, judicial and ethical considerations. Wednesday, March 1, 6 to 7:30 p.m, Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building

Other highlights include:

  • A film on the life of Octavius Catto will be followed by a discussion on Wednesday, March 1, 1:50 to 2:50 p.m., Great Hall, Room S2-19, Winnet Student Life Building;
  • Author Cristina Henríquez will discuss her book, which highlights issues of immigrants and immigration to the United States on Thursday, March 2, 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28.
  • A mobile command post operated by the Homeland Security Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department will offer tours on Thursday, March 2, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the West Philadelphia Regional Center, Main Entrance.

Law and Society Week closes on March 3 with the “Judicial Affairs Conference” from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. For more information, contact: LawCenter@ccp.edu For a full schedule of events, visit: www.ccp.edu/law-week

 

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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

Contact: Linda Wallace, 215-751-8082, liswallace@ccp.edu

Philadelphia Initiative Provides Small Businesses with the Resources to Create Big Impact

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Feb. 22, 2017 - What’s the next big thing in Philadelphia? Neighborhood businesses. Community College of Philadelphia is offering a bold, new initiative— designed to strengthen commercial corridors in local neighborhoods and provide free services for small businesses that employ local residents.

Power Up Your Business, which launched this year and is currently enrolling small business owners and entrepreneurs, offers free training and tools, strategies and best practices for developing a business. From childcare centers and corner store grocers to micro businesses— Community College of Philadelphia’s program is a neighborhood-centered approach to economic prosperity.

“Power Up Your Business has answered so many of my questions about opening and managing a small business,” said aspiring South Philadelphia small business owner, Carey Madden, who participated in the College’s first workshop in January. “Now, thanks to the connections and resources offered through the program, I know where to go and who to ask when more questions crop up. I feel so much more confident in my ability to run a successful business.”

"We are excited at the initial response to this innovative program designed to serve Philadelphia's small businesses in the neighborhood,” said Carol de Fries, the College’s vice president of Workforce and Economic Innovation. “Since the workshops began on Jan. 11th, over 100 attendees representing more than 60 neighborhood businesses have participated, and they have come from at least 17 zip codes across the city. A wide range of companies are participating, including day care centers, cafes, beauty salons, retail stores, cleaning companies and more. Five of the businesses that enrolled in the initial workshops later returned for the more intense, 10-week program."

The initiative offers several levels of training, at the College’s three regional centers and Main Campus. The Store Owner Series covers small business basics, such as financial management, personal and business credit, bookkeeping and neighborhood-based marketing.

It is currently open for enrollment at the College’s Main Campus on Tuesdays from 8-11AM; upcoming dates include:

  • Feb 21: Personal and Businesses Credit for Growth
  • March 14: Basics of Bookkeeping
  • Mar 28: Resource Event: Resources for Small Businesses Interested attendees can RSVP on the College’s website at www.ccp.edu/powerup, registration closes a week prior to each program.

Business owners seeking a more intensive program should consider the Peer-Based Learning training, which offers a 10-week, 30 hour per week, peer-based learning session for up to 25 businesses at a time. The College will match each participant with a professional coach who will, among other things, connect them to small business resources.

The peer-based learning series are scheduled at all the College’s locations, including Main Campus and the Northwest, Northeast and West Regional Centers. To qualify, participants must have at least one full time employee and earn less than $1 million in revenue per year.

Peer learning classes at the Main Campus are May 17th, 24th and 31st; June 7th, 14th, 21s and 28th; and July 12th, 19th and 26th. Applications for the Main Campus Cohort are currently under review; those interested can register on the College’s website at www.ccp.edu/powerup.

A newly released report by the non-profit Initiative for a Competitive Inner City titled The Big Impact of Small Business on Urban Job Creation found that small businesses are the biggest job creators in most cities, especially in underserved neighborhoods. The study examined five big cities across the nation - Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles and Washington, DC; discovering that if small inner-city businesses hired an additional one to three employees each, unemployment could be eliminated in most neighborhoods.

“There are workshops and grants for businesses with large revenue streams, but small businesses like mine are excluded because we don’t meet the benchmark,” says Power Up advisory board member, and owner of Marz Auto Center, Monica Parrilla. “Small businesses have the power to keep the local economy moving, provide jobs in our area and to increase our revenue.”

For additional information or questions about Power Up’s workshops or programs, please contact the business office at 215-496-6151 or via email at powerup@ccp.edu.

 

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Community College of Philadelphia is the largest public institution of higher education in Philadelphia and the sixth largest in Pennsylvania. The College enrolls approximately 34,000 students annually and offers day, evening, and weekend classes, as well as classes online. Visit the College at www.ccp.edu. Follow us on Twitter. Like us on Facebook.

Parkway Center City High School will soon take on a new name in the fall — Parkway Center City Middle College High School. Starting in the 2017-18 school year, the special admission school will offer incoming ninth-graders the opportunity to graduate with high school diplomas, associate degrees and up to two professional certifications each.

Parkway Center City Middle College is designed to prepare all students for college, careers and participation in the knowledge-based global economy. It is a collaboration between the District and the Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) to provide students in Philadelphia a rigorous high school education with the added value of a college degree.

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