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Behavioral Health/Human Services Courses

NOTE: Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are open only to BHHS students.

BHHS 101 Introduction to Behavioral Health and Human Services

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course introduces students to the field of Behavioral Health and Human Services. In this course, students gain an understanding of the historical underpinnings of the field. Students are also introduced to the work of the human service provider and the milieu in which client services are provided. An exploration of ethics, values and self-understanding as these apply to the human services worker also comprises an important element of the course. An overview of research methods is included as well.

BHHS 103 Human Development and Behavior in the Social Environment

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

The student will gain an understanding of human development throughout the life cycle using a person-in-environment framework that includes the biophysical, psychological and sociological dimensions. Using this framework, the student will learn how to assess the functioning of individuals, relevant to their particular life stage, for planning helping interventions.
Fulfills American/Global Diversity requirement.

BHHS 105 Introduction to Group Dynamics

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Course presents different theories on the functioning of small face-to-face groups. Concepts such as norms, goals, leadership, cohesion, membership and decision-making will be explained. Students will practice observation skills so that they can diagnose a group. Each student also will have an opportunity to lead a group, exercising these observation skills.
Open to all students.

BHHS 106 Analysis of Group Participation*

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Students will participate as members of a small ongoing group. They will use the theory and concepts from Introduction to Group Dynamics and apply them to their own interactions. The emphasis will be on how groups influence the individual and how the individual, in turn, influences the group. Personal communication skills should be enhanced.
Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in BHHS 105.

BHHS 111 Introduction to Helping Skills

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Learning and application of basic and advanced interpersonal skills, as well as the ability to establish working relationships with individuals that help clients identify, explore and develop action plans. BHHS students must satisfactorily complete this course with a “C” grade or higher before taking practica and other higher level courses.
Prerequisite: BHHS 101, which may be taken concurrently.

BHHS 121 Foundations of Addiction Studies

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

The biopsychosocial aspects of various addictive behavior will be examined. This will include the pharmacology of addictive substances, the physiological effects on the user, the psychological consequences of use, and the sociological conditions that cause and result from substance abuse. A brief history of drug and alcohol abuse will be introduced, along with various treatment approaches to addictions.

BHHS 131 Faith and Spirituality in Human Services

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course integrates secular helping skills with faith-based healing practices in human services. Students will gain an understanding of community empowerment models of recovery and their interaction with faith and spiritual beliefs. The course explores issues of cultural competence, ethical practice and helping/healing relationships. Human services practices are discussed in the context of systems that promote recovery and resilience. The course concludes with a description of alternative healing resources that support optimal living.

BHHS 151 Family Violence, Abuse and Trauma

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course will explore the causes and effects of family violence and appropriate professional response.

BHHS 161 Introduction to Disabilities

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed for students who are preparing to or currently work in the field of disability services. It provides students with the opportunity to develop an understanding and knowledge of disabilities that takes into consideration the individual with a disability, societal influences, the environmental setting and governance of disability law. The role of the disability support provider, types of services and the manner in which services are delivered are also examined in this course.

BHHS 171 Introduction to Social Gerontology

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Survey course on issues affecting older adults. Among the topics are myths and realities, family, physical and mental health and health care, dying and death, minority status and retirement. Part of the special Gerontology certificate program.
Open to all students.

BHHS 194 Case Management Practice*

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Students are introduced to the concept of case management within the context of human service delivery. They develop observation, problem-solving, recording and relationship building skills through the exploration of the case management process which includes client engagement and assessment, interview techniques and collection of client information. Students learn how to plan and develop a case file, refer clients for services, monitor the service coordination process and terminate a case. They also explore professional responsibility and cultural diversity in the context of case management practice.
Prerequisite: BHHS 111 with a "C" grade or better.

BHHS 195 Practicum in Behavioral Health/Human Services I*

3-12-3
Credit Hours: 3

This is the first of two practicum courses in which students work directly with clients. Students spend 12 hours per week (156 hours per semester) in a field placement related to their area of interest. In addition, during class time they discuss field experiences and present a case related to a client and/or agency.
Prerequisite: BHHS 111 with a “C” grade or better.

BHHS 212 Resolution-Focused Helping Skills*

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

BHHS 212 introduces students to the values, concepts, vocabulary, knowledge base and practice skills of time-sensitive approaches to helping relationships. The cultural and historical factors that have shaped time-limited approaches to treatment are emphasized. The course addresses how people change, extra-therapeutic factors and clinician-specific variables that predict successful outcomes in helping relationships. Motivational interviewing and resolution-focused models of helping are introduced and specific skill sets are practiced through role-plays, supervision, and audio and video recording. Students learn to work with individuals of varying ages and abilities in a variety of behavioral health settings and with groups using skills sets such as assessing readiness, identifying key challenges, establishing goals and taking specific action steps. This course is a continuation of BHHS 111, Introduction to Helping Skills.
Prerequisite: BHHS 111 with a “C” grade or better.
Corequisite: BHHS 213, which must be taken concurrently.

BHHS 213 Practicum in Behavioral Health/Human Services II*

3-12-3
Credit Hours: 3

This is the second of two practicum courses in which students work directly with clients. Students spend 12 hours per week (156 hours per semester) in a field placement. During class time, students develop the ability to make meaningful connections between direct practice experience and classroom knowledge especially as it relates to utilizing resolution-focused helping skills, increasing competence at managing personal responses to client issues and developing skills related to professional identity.
Prerequisite: BHHS 195 with a "C" grade or better.
Corequisite: BHHS 212.

BHHS 222 Assessment and Service Planning in Recovery

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course will explore the medical, psychological, cultural and social aspects of recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs of abuse. The student will be introduced to counseling techniques, case management, extended recovery and a person first approach to assessment issues, professional responsibility and proper ethical practice. Special populations such as dually diagnosed (co-occurring disorders) individuals and HIV substance abusers will be discussed. The course compares the traditional medical model and the community based social model of recovery.
Prerequisite: BHHS 121.

BHHS 241 Crisis Intervention

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Prepares students to give immediate help to people experiencing crises. Applies a short-term crisis intervention model for assessing and helping persons regain equilibrium during these crisis experiences. Simulations and role-playing activities are used to model crisis intervention with situations such as: post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide, sexual assault, partner battering, addictions and personal loss.

BHHS 261 Developmental Disabilities Support Services

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Students will gain specific knowledge and skills that will assist them in better understanding and serving the unique needs of adults with developmental disabilities. Students will learn to employ assessment techniques, programming strategies, goal planning and life skills training that support self-advocacy, productivity, and community and family inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities.
Prerequisite: BHHS 161.

BHHS 277 Behavioral Development and Social Processes of Aging

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Focus on the biological, psychological and social issues affecting older adults. Application of research findings to practice and policy. Case study approach. Required for the Gerontology certificate.
Prerequisite: BHHS 171 or equivalent or permission of the coordinator.

BHHS 293 Family and Relationship Counseling*

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course focuses on counseling skills necessary to work with families and couples from a systems approach. Students will have an opportunity to practice the skills they learned in BHHS 111. They will apply those skills to relationships, including families and couples. In addition, class time will be devoted to learning about multicultural and diversity issues involved in working with families.
Prerequisite: BHHS 111 with a "C" grade or better.

Unless otherwise noted, all college level courses require English 101 placement.