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Anthropology Courses

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Survey of the four sub-fields of anthropology; cultural, physical and linguistic anthropology; and archaeology. Topics include ancient civilizations, evolution, “primitive” peoples, “talking” apes, how our early ancestors lived, language, races and how people in other societies are both different and similar.
Fulfills American/Global Diversity requirement.

ANTH 112 Cultural Anthropology

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Cultural Anthropology examines the nature of culture from the perspective of anthropology. The course is a survey of language, kinship, social structure, political organization, technology, economic systems, culture change, art and religion. It uses a cross-cultural approach, with examples from literate and non-literate societies of the world. Both economic and cultural globalization processes are examined.
Fulfills American/Global Diversity, Interpretive Studies, and Writing Intensive requirements.

ANTH 124 Fundamentals of Archaeology

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Fundamentals of Archaeology presents the study of archaeology as one of the major subfields of anthropology. Archaeology is the study of humans through the materials that they create and use. In this course, students will learn the theories and methods that archaeologists use to study the material culture remains of some ancient and some not so ancient societies, and they will study how archaeologists use these methods to interpret human behavior. Students will use a variety of strategies to investigate past societies from various parts of the world.
Fulfills American/Global Diversity and Interpretive Studies requirements.

ANTH 125 Physical Anthropology

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

Covers the biological side of human existence. Topics include race, the relationship between human biology and behavior, evolution, the evidence linking us to the “cavemen” or “ape-men,” primates and their relationship to us, and the similarities and differences among modern peoples.

ANTH 202 Gender Roles in Cross-Cultural Perspective

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines perspectives on women, men and gender roles using the theories and methods of anthropology as a guide. It explores women’s and men’s roles in a variety of social institutions, including those of marriage and the family, education and socialization, the sexual division of labor, politics, religion and health care delivery. It also focuses on the ways that the categories of race, class, gender and sexual preference affect our view of the world and help to create our self perceptions. Examples are drawn from both American society and non-Western cultures.
Prerequisites: ENGL 101, plus one of the following: ANTH 101, ANTH 112 or SOC 101.
Fulfills Interpretive Studies and American/Global Diversity requirements.

ANTH 211 African Peoples and Cultures

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course presents an anthropological approach to the societies of Africa that recognizes both the diversity of Africa and the unifying themes common to African cultures. Students will explore the African past, the impact of colonization, and the variety of family, economic, and political arrangements in contemporary African societies. African music, dance, oral literature and art will be investigated in both traditional and modern contexts. These varied course experiences will provide students with an integrated view of Africa today.
Prerequisite: Any social or behavioral science course.
Fulfills Interpretive Studies and American/Global Diversity requirements.

ANTH 215 Peoples and Cultures of Asia

3-0-3
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines societies of Asia from the point of view of people who have lived there. Students will read firsthand accounts of life in three regions of Asia and study family life and the working world in each society. They will also study art and politics as mediums of change in Asian societies. The course will include information on the archeology of early civilizations, readings in the classics of Chinese religion and attention to the influences of China on other regions of Asia. Students will examine the forces of change that affect the lives of Asian people today and the influences of Asian society and culture on the West.
Prerequisite: Any social or behavioral science course.
Fulfills Interpretive Studies and American/Global Diversity requirements.

Unless otherwise noted, all college level courses require English 101 placement.