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Law and Society Week

15th Annual Law and Society Week — 2014 Schedule of Events

Presented by the Fox Rothschild Center for Law and Society

This annual week of legal events, designed for the College Family and local community, features workshops, lectures, film screenings and panel discussions on a variety of current topics. Law and Society Week usually begins at the end of February. Many events qualify for continuing legal education credits. 

For location information and directions, view our map of Main Campus buildings and our Northeast Regional Center, Northwest Regional Center and West Regional Center pages.

Date Event Details

Monday, February 24, 2014

Homeland Security Mobile Command Post Tours (Main)

10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Front of the Mint Building on Spring Garden Street
The tours are scheduled to begin every hour on the hour. The last tour will begin at 2:00 p.m.

Visit the nerve center of a mobile command post operated by the Homeland Security Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department. Come see the cutting-edge equipment of modern emergency management. The command unit will be parked directly in front of the Mint Building on Spring Garden Street

 

Safe Space Training (NWRC)

10:30  - 11:30 a.m., NWRC Room 216
Co-sponsored by the Diversity and Equity Office and the Rainbow Alliance - training on how to create a safe and discrimination-free space for all CCP students including the LGBTQ community. Presenter: J. Alison Watts, Ph.D

 

Opening Reception (Main) *by invitation only*

3 - 5 p.m., Library
Patrick Murphy, Esq., partner with Fox Rothschild LLP and former U.S. Representative, will provide opening remarks. Join us as we officially open the 15th Annual Law and Society Week! The Library will feature Law and Society exhibits, and refreshments will be offered.

 

A Conversation with the Honorable Edward G. Rendell (Main)

6 to 7:30 p.m., Great Hall, S2-19
This session will feature the former mayor of Philadelphia and governor of Pennsylvania talking about his career and using his experience as a prism to discuss current events.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Making a Federal Case Out of It: A View of the Federal Bench from the Inside (Main)

*1.5 hours CLE

8  to 9:30 a.m., Great Hall, S2-19
This session features prominent members of the federal judiciary, including Judge Theodore A. McKee, Chief Justice of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals,  discussing their lives and careers on the bench.
Moderator: David Keller Trevaskis, Esq.

 

Evolving Role of DNA in the Criminal Justice System (Main)

*1.5 hours CLE

9:40 to 11:10 a.m., S2-3
From the BTK Killer to Scott Peterson to the Supreme Court, join us for a conversation about the intersection of biology and the criminal justice system. DNA and its evolving role in criminal investigation and prosecution will make for a lively discussion.
Panelists: Kristy Shuda McGuire, Ph.D., assistant professor, Biology; Mary Ann Wagner-Graham, Ph.D., assistant professor, Biology; and David Freeman, JD, associate professor, Social Science

The 10th Annual Reporters’ Panel (Main)

11:20 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., Bonnell Auditorium, BG-20
Reporters from across the Delaware Valley will once again share their thoughts on the challenges and rewards of reporting crime and the news. This year, we are excited to have the return of the reporters who began this annual event: Tony Hanson, CBS 3 News; Walt Hunter, CBS 3/KYW News; Dave Schratwieser, Fox 29; and Tom Gibbons, The Philadelphia Inquirer (retired). The panelists will look at the past and future of crime and news reporting in Philadelphia.

 

Alternatives to Juvenile Courts: The Youth Court at Strawberry Mansion High School (Main)

1 to 2:30 p.m., Great Hall, S2-19

This session provides a showcase of the successful Strawberry Mansion Youth Court that has grown out of a partnership between the school and the United States Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. A mock youth court will be demonstrated in this dynamic session.
Panelists:  Evan Kramp, Strawberry Mansion students, Chief Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Reed and Regional Youth Court Support Center Director Gregg Volz
Moderator: Pennsylvania Bar Association Pro Bono Coordinator, David Keller Trevaskis, Esq.


Cyberintelligence: Why it Matters (Main)

*1.5 hours CLE

2:40 to 4:10 p.m., C2-28
The core focus is to help participants develop safe and secure uses of technology along with understanding its potential impact. Topics of discussion include digital security skills and practice, digital safety, digital communication, intellectual property, privacy, cyber harassment, and social issues on the Web. Responsibilities, rules and consequences are addressed for each topic as participants relate online citizenship with real-world citizenship.
Co-sponsored and presented by Bowman & Partners, LLP
 

The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI (Main)

* 1.5 hours CLE

6 to 7:30 p.m., Great Hall, S2-19
Surveillance vs. Spying: When is Big Brother watching?  In this session, participants will consider the historic break-in at the FBI office in Media, PA in 1971, by a group of unlikely activists that made clear that J. Edgar Hoover had created, in violation of the U.S. Constitution, his own shadow Bureau of Investigation. Presented by: Betty Medsger, author of The Burglary; and burglars John and Bonnie Raines
Moderator: David Kairys, Esq., Professor of Law at Temple University Beasley School of Law, who represented some of the burglars


Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Homeland Security Mobile Command Post Tours (NERC)

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., NERC, Front entrance of the building
The tours are scheduled to begin every hour on the hour. The last tour will begin at 2 p.m.

Visit the nerve center of a mobile command post operated by the Homeland Security Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department. Come see the cutting-edge equipment of modern emergency management. The command unit will be parked directly in front of the building entrance.

International Human Trafficking (NWRC)

*1.0 hour CLE

11 a.m. to 12 p.m., NWRC, Room 216
Human trafficking is considered one of the fastest growing criminal industries in the world. Where most people think that this activity does not impact them personally, different forms of forced labor have been uncovered throughout the United States and abroad. This lecture will discuss the social implications and criminal aspects of human trafficking, as well as the ways in which it is being combated in the United States and abroad.
Presenter: Nicole Vadino, MA,  associate professor, Social Science

 

Special Education and the Law: Advocating for Your Child (Main)

*1.0 hour CLE

10:20 to 11:20 a.m., C2-28
This session offers a look at the current law on special education and how it affects parents, children and educational institutions. Experts in the field will address key developments and answer your questions.
Presenters: Mary Falcone Montgomery, Ed.D. and Joseph Montgomery, Esq.

 

Tenderloin: Organized Crime on Spring Garden Street: The Community College of Philadelphia Neighborhood in the 20s and 30s: A Book Event with Annie Anderson with Interactive Maps from GIS (Main)

11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Library
In the years between the World Wars, Philadelphia's downtown entertainment district, stretching northwest to City Hall and southeast to Washington Square, was a hub of illicit activity. Boxing promoters, bootleggers and beer barons rubbed elbows with magistrates, police and corrupt politicians in the district's cafés, hotel, and nightclubs. Speakeasies thrived, and crime spiraled out of control. Philadelphia fulfilled its reputation as "corrupt and contented." With the help of maps from the College’s GIS students, local historian Annie Anderson will discuss how Prohibition-era organized crime impacted this neighborhood and surrounding communities.
Presenter: Annie Anderson
Co-sponsored by the Geographic Information Systems program

 

Cyberintelligence: Why it Matters (NWRC)

*1.0 hour CLE

6 to 7 p.m., NWRC, Room 216
The core focus is to help participants develop safe and secure uses of technology along with understanding its potential impact. Topics of discussion include digital security skills and practice, digital safety, digital communication, intellectual property, privacy, cyber harassment, and social issues on the Web. Responsibilities, rules and consequences are addressed for each topic as participants relate online citizenship with real-world citizenship.
Co-sponsored and presented by Bowman & Partners, LLP


Anatomy of Fire Investigation (NERC)

* 3.0 hours CLE

6 to 9 p.m., NERC, Room 124
This session provides insight into nationally recognized scientific and practical techniques used by Fire Investigators in determining the origin and cause of fires. Presenter: Battalion Chief Ed Hojnicki, Wilmington, Delaware Fire Department.

 

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Domestic Violence and Technology (Main)

*1.5 hours CLE

9:40 to 11:10 a.m., C2-28

Advances in technology have unfortunately resulted in new ways to stalk and harass individuals, particularly in domestic violence cases. Understanding technology misuse is crucial to both supporting victims and holding offenders accountable. This training will look at the various ways that technology is misused as a tactic of abuse and the ways that survivors (and everyone) can strategically use technology to increase their safety and privacy. The Safety Net Project at the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) focuses on the intersection of technology and intimate partner violence, and provides trainings and technical assistance to professionals working with survivors of abuse.
Presenter: Erica L. Olsen, Technology Safety Expert, Safety Net

 

Legal Implications of Nursing (Main)

*1.5 hours CLE

9:40 to 11:10 a.m., S2-3
Paul Bechtel, Esq., a nationally renowned expert on law and medicine and a veteran of more than 300 jury trials, will discuss nursing and issues of legal liability in medicine. Mr. Bechtel is a retired partner of Marshall, Dennehey, Warner, Coleman & Goggin.

 

Philadelphia CSI Comes to NERC

*2.0 hours CLE

10 a.m. to 12 p.m., NERC, Room 124
This popular session is offered for the first time at NERC! The Philadelphia Police Department’s Crime Scene Unit will explain its role in photographing and sketching crime scenes, as well as its method in the identification and processing of crime scene evidence. Actual and sometimes graphic crime scene photos will be shown.

 

The Science of the Streets: Family Orientation, Snitching and Perceptions of Disrespect (Main)

11:20 a.m. to 12:50 p.m., C2-28
The Snitching Project is an ongoing student-driven interdisciplinary research initiative aimed at developing a better understanding of the "Stop Snitching" phenomenon through the use of large-scale survey research. This semester's project focuses on the concept of street vs. decent family orientation, as conceptualized in Elijah Anderson's seminal ethnography “Code of the Streets,” as a predictor of attitudes toward snitching and perceptions of disrespect.
Presenters: Rick Frei, Ph.D., and the students of PSYC 110: Descriptive Research Methods in Psychology

 

Grand Tech Auto Squad: A 21st Century Approach to the Auto Crime (West)

*1.5 hours CLE

12 to 1:15 p.m., WERC Auto Lab
This exciting presentation by the Auto Squad of the Major Crimes Unit of the Philadelphia Police will explain and demonstrate the latest technologies and techniques for investigating and solving auto thefts and insurance fraud. Presenter: Staff Inspector Jerrold Bates of the Specialized Investigations Bureau

 

Witness to Innocence: The Story of Kirk Bloodsworth (Main)

1 to 2:30 p.m., Great Hall, S2-19

Kirk Bloodsworth, whose story has been told in major media outlets, including The New York Times, NPR, CNN and Oprah Winfrey, shares his story of serving eight years on death row for a horrific assault and murder of a child before becoming the first person in the U.S. to be exonerated from death row as a result of DNA evidence. Congress subsequently created the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Program, and a documentary about the case is in production. Co-sponsored by Witness to Innocence


Cyberintelligence: Why it Matters (West)

* 1.0 hour CLE

2 to 3 p.m., WERC, Room 134
The core focus is to help participants develop safe and secure uses of technology along with understanding its potential impact. Topics of discussion include digital security skills and practice, digital safety, digital communication, intellectual property, privacy, cyber harassment, and social issues on the Web. Responsibilities, rules and consequences are addressed for each topic as participants relate online citizenship with real-world citizenship.
Co-sponsored and presented by Bowman & Partners, LLP

Hospitality and the Law: Will You Be Served? (Main)

* 1.5 hours CLE

2:40 to 4:10 p.m., P2-03
Join Howard Cannon, author and CEO/founder of Restaurant Expert Witness and Restaurant Operations Institute, Inc., as he discusses the intersection of legal issues and restaurant management in this lively session.
Co-sponsored by the Division of Business and Technology – Doing Business Globally Speaker Series

 

The Judges’ Panel (Main)

6 to 7 p.m., Room S2-19, Great Hall
Distinguished judges discuss their lives in the law, achieving balance and the challenges of a legal career.
Moderator: The Honorable Holly J. Ford, Judge, Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas

 

Key Cases in Digital Forensics (NERC)

*1.0 hour CLE

6 to 7 p.m., NERC, Room 124
Major criminal cases increasingly involve digital evidence. Bank robbers use GPS to plot their heists, murderers research poison on the web and mobile phone data shows criminal connections. A digital forensics expert will discuss key cases in this lively lecture. Cases discussed include the BTK Serial Killer, who terrorized Witchita, KS, for 30 years; and Scott William Tyree, who used the Internet to find his victims. This session will address how digital forensics helped bring these perpetrators to justice.
Presenter: Pamela King, Manager of Discovery and Forensic Infrastructure at LDiscovery
Co-sponsored by the Computer Forensics program