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Law and Society Week

18th Annual Law and Society Week — February 27 to March 3, 2017

Presented by the Fox Rothschild Center for Law and Society and co-sponsored by the Pro Bono Committee of the Pennsylvania Bar Association and The Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement

This annual week of legal events, designed for the College Family and local community, features workshops, lectures, film screenings and panel discussions on a variety of current topics. Many events qualify for continuing legal education (CLE) credits – pre-registration is not required, all sessions are free and open to the public.

Remembering Anna Vadino

This 18th Law and Society Week is dedicated to the memory of a very special supporter of the Center, Anna Vadino. When her daughter, Nicole Vadino, joined the College 15 years ago, Anna enthusiastically embraced the Center’s work and attended every Law and Society Week. Her enthusiasm for the week’s events always provided welcomed encouragement in a wonderful, but sometimes frenzied week. Anna’s kind remembrance of the Center will support scholarships for students who embrace careers in law and society fields. She was an extraordinary woman who entered the legal field as the fourth female attorney admitted in Delaware County. Those of us who work with the Fox Rothschild Center for Law and Society are honored to have known her.

Schedule of Events

*Please Note: there is no course fee however, lawyers seeking CLE credit must return a copy of the certificate of attendance and a check for $1.50 per credit hour to PA CLE.

For location information and directions, view our map of Main Campus buildings and our Northeast Regional Center, Northwest Regional Center and West Regional Center pages.

Complete Law Society Week Program

Download the complete program guide for 2017 Law Society Week

Classroom Discussion Guide

Download the 2017 Class room Discussion Guide

Date Event Details

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Community Law School Day | 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, 2nd and 3rd Floors

Individuals and community advocates will benefit from education and skill-building workshop sessions, in addition to free legal assistance clinics. Come learn about child custody, rental housing law and your rights as a tenant, representing yourself in court, your rights when dealing with the police, cutting through red tape when dealing with bureaucracies to get public benefits and services, how to find legal help and information online, and how to negotiate. Legal clinics will offer assistance with child support issues, criminal record expungement assessment, tax preparation, and Individualized Education Program review and development. Pre-registration is highly recommended, though walk-ins will be accepted as space allows. See the full schedule and register for free.

Co-sponsored by Community Legal Services and Philadelphia Legal Assistance, with contributions from the ACLU of Pennsylvania, Clarifi, PathWays PA and the PEAL Center

Monday, February 27, 2017


International Human Trafficking | 10:20 to 11:20 a.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

Human trafficking is considered one of the fastest growing criminal industries in the world. Where most people think that this activity does not impact them personally, different forms of forced labor have been uncovered throughout the United States and abroad.  The efforts to stop and understand the networks of Human Trafficking at home and abroad are immense. Using everyday individuals to help authorities pursue trafficking situations with simple apps has become commonplace. Assistant professor Deirdre Garrity-Benjamin will delve into how GIS and law professional are exposing human trafficking at home and abroad. On the surface, chocolate is a readily available and delicious treat, but there is a dark side to chocolate-one that involves the trafficking of children, especially in West Africa. Join us for an eye-opening discussion, with anthropologist Donna Gottardi, on the world of human trafficking- specifically the trafficking of children, in our quest for cheap chocolate. Donna was first exposed to these problems during her world travels and has made it a passion to educate the public about this “dark world,” but also to provide a solution through the selling of fair trade chocolates. This powerful discussion will leave you educated on one of our favorite treats.    

Presenters: Donna Gottardi, Owner of My Fair Trade Lady, Haddon Height NJ; Deirdre Garrity-Benjamin, Assistant Professor of Social Science and GIS Program Coordinator. Moderators: Nicole Vadino and Faye Allard, Ph.D., assistant professors, Sociology

*1 hour Substantive CLE

 

Savage Inequities: A Tale of Two Schools | 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

Philadelphia’s Kensington Health Science High School and Montgomery County’s Methacton High School are less than an hour’s drive from each other, but the realities of the two institutions are dimensions apart. This session looks at a project in which students from the two schools participated in an exchange that opened eyes and hearts in unexpected ways. Statistics show that Methacton spends several thousands of dollars per child more than is spent at Kensington, but this powerful session will showcase far more than statistics. 

Presenters: Anthony Maida, teacher, Methacton High School; James Williams, principal, Kensington Health Science High School; and David Trevaskis, Esq., Pro Bono Counsel, Pennsylvania Bar Association

 

Days of OUR Lives” Theater Presentation | 1:40 to 2:40 p.m.

Main Campus, Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20

The resident company of Community College of Philadelphia, Once More Theatre, will perform a collection of monologues and scenes written by students from the REACH Program of the College’s Reentry Support Project.

 

Opening Reception | 3 to 5 p.m.

Main Campus, Pavilion Cube, Room P2-03

Thomas D. Paradise, General Counsel at Fox Rothschild LLP will provide opening remarks. Join us as we officially open the 18th Annual Law and Society Week! Refreshments, exhibits and more.

 

Life and Death with Dignity: A Conversation with Barbara Mancini | 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

Barbara Mancini is a registered nurse whose yearlong prosecution by former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane for allegedly aiding the attempted suicide of her father by handing him pain medication made national news. Ms. Mancini became an activist for Death with Dignity as a result, and her story has been told on “60 Minutes” and CNN. This session features a discussion of her story and a consideration of important end-of-life issues.

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Murder in Marple | 9:40 to 11:10 a.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

Benjamin D’Amore abused his wife for the last time on Nov. 29, 1949. That night, his sons John and Nicholas exacted revenge and executed Benjamin with a shotgun and deer rifle. The trial that followed was unlike many before it. Author Thomas Deitman unravels the horrific events and conspiracies regarding this shocking patricide case, explaining the differences between the law then and now.

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

 

Domestic Violence: Do You Hear Me? A Symphony of Hope | 11:20 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Main Campus, Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20

A multimedia presentation including a song, panel and a skit on the many facets of domestic violence. This session will also include a presentation on Protection from Abuse standards and provide an opportunity for discussion. This session will also include a presentation By William Love, Esq., on Protection from Abuse standards and provide an opportunity for discussion. 

Moderator: William Love, Esq., chair, Social Science department

Co-sponsored by the Pennsylvania Eastern Baptist Association

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

 

Perspectives on Healing in the Aftermath of Violence: A Restorative Justice Peace Circle | 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-5

Pennsylvania has 500 juvenile lifers, 300 of whom are from Philadelphia. In the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision to end the practice of life without parole, or death by incarceration for juveniles, Pennsylvania’s juvenile lifers must have their cases resentenced. This workshop will take place in a peacemaking circle, a Native American/First Nation dialogue practice. We will discuss juvenile lifers, but will also explore the aftermath of violence and what to do about healing. Present in this circle will be several individuals who are co-victims of violence, where the victim was a loved one, and some that have had family members serving life sentences for homicide. This circle is facilitated by adjunct professor Don Haldeman and Saint Joseph’s University.

 

Copyrights and the Self-published Songwriter/Artist | 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

This workshop will explore the challenges facing songwriters and artists in the current music industry climate. An emphasis will be placed on securing copyrights for one’s works, as well as understanding the various ways in which music is monetized. Come hear a firsthand take on ways to navigate the ever-changing music industry landscape. Join Paul J. Geissinger, producer, composer and chair of the College’s Music Department for this lively session.

*1.5 hrs Substantive CLE


Children as Change Makers | 2:40 to 4:10 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

This panel looks at the power of children to effectuate meaningful change in society. Panelists include Mary Beth Tinker, who as a 13-year-old girl in the 60s wore a black armband to school, leading to a Supreme Court case defining the free speech rights of juveniles. Alexis Werner, who started the nonprofit Seeds of Hope, will discuss creating the organization as a high school student struggling to understand the issues faced by her stepfather on his return from Afghanistan.

Moderator: David Trevaskis, Esq., Pro Bono Counsel, Pennsylvania Bar Association

*1.5 hrs Substantive CLE

 

The First Amendment Gets Personal: The Tinker Case | 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

Mary Beth Tinker, one of the plaintiffs in the Tinker case that redefined the free speech rights of juveniles, discusses her cases and puts it into the legal framework of First Amendment jurisprudence. The Honorable Theodore McKee, judge in the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, will participate in this discussion.

Moderator: David Trevaskis, Esq., Pro Bono Counsel, Pennsylvania Bar Association

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Youth Court Meeting | 9 to 10:20 a.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

Invitation Only


Homeland Security Mobile Command Post Tours | 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Main Campus, Spring Garden Street Mint Building entrance

Visit the nerve center of a mobile command post operated by the Homeland Security Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department. Come see the cutting-edge equipment of modern emergency management.

 

Promoting Intellectual Diversity in an Inclusive Environment | 9 to 10:20 a.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

The Supreme Court has yet to rule directly on whether speech codes on college campuses violate the First Amendment. Lower U.S. District Courts have delivered seemingly contradictory decisions striking down some codes (Doe v. Michigan, DeJohn v. Temple University) and upholding others (Keefe v. Adams). The broader context for this speech code discussion is the capacity of institutions of higher learning to simultaneously promote the principles of diversity and inclusion while also protecting vibrant and diverse intellectual discourse. This panel will explore the boundaries of intellectual discourse on college campuses and the concept of promoting a safe space for the free market of ideas.

*1 hour Substantive CLE

 

Opiate Addiction: Why the Increase, and What Can We Do About It? | 10:20 to 11:20 a.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

The abuse of and addiction to opiates is a serious global problem. An estimated 2.1 million people in the United States suffer from substance use disorders related to prescription opioid pain relievers. This addiction can affect the health, social and economic welfare of all involved, with unintentional overdose deaths soaring since 1999. We need to address the rise in addiction while still maintaining the profound role that these pain relievers provide for millions suffering from pain. This panel will discuss the science of addiction, explain the rapid increase we have seen in recent years and offer suggestions to reduce death rates. You will also learn how guidelines for prescriptions have changed and what the DEA is doing about this epidemic.

Panelists: Vince Lattanzio, NBC10 reporter and dayside journalism lead for NBC10 Digital; Gary Tuggle, Special Agent in Charge, Philadelphia Field Division, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration; Bradley Nash, Ph.D. candidate, Drexel University College of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Physiology

*1 hour Substantive CLE

 

System Change: Youth Courts and Time Banks | 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

See a demonstration of a youth court, featuring Philadelphia school students, with the help of Gregg Volz of the Regional Youth Court Support Center and Pennsylvania Bar Association Pro Bono Coordinator David Trevaskis.  Distinguished legal scholar and activist Edgar Cahn, along with Dr. Christine Gray, discuss their dynamic work on affecting systems change and building stronger communities. Youth Courts and Time Banking, two of Professor Cahn’s innovations in system change, will also be discussed.

*1 hour Substantive CLE

 

Youth Courts | 12:40 to 1:40 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

Distinguished legal scholar and activist Edgar Cahn, along with Dr. Christine Gray, will further discuss their dynamic work on affecting systems change and building stronger communities. Youth Courts and Time Banking, two of Professor Cahn’s innovations in system change, will be discussed.  Gregg Volz of the Regional Youth Court Support Center and Pennsylvania Bar Association Pro Bono Coordinator David Trevaskis will be among the Judges and lawyers from the Philadelphia area who will share their thoughts on youth courts.

*1 hour Substantive CLE

 

Octavius Catto: Remembering a Forgotten Hero | 1:50 to 2:50 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

Nineteenth century Philadelphian, Octavius Valentine Catto, was a remarkable scholar, teacher, civil rights leader, community organizer and athlete. Sadly, his name and his deeds have been for too long left out of the mainstream historical narrative. Fortunately, our city will soon get an important and long overdue history lesson. Thanks to the vigorous efforts of Mayor Kenney and many others, a statue memorializing Catto will soon be installed on the south apron of City Hall—the first monument to an individual African-American ever erected in Philadelphia. In this interactive session led by Amy Cohen, director of Education for the documentary film company History Making Productions, participants will view clips from “An Equal Chance: 1855-1871,” a segment from the 14-part “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” series, which can be viewed for free at historyofphilly.com. Participants will also examine and analyze primary sources related to Catto’s life story and will engage in discussions based on provocative and timely questions raised by the content of the film.

 

Tasting Freedom: Octavius Catto, Civil Rights and Legal Challenges | 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

The authors of a biography of Octavius Catto, which has been called “a towering, persuasive narrative,” discuss Catto and the turbulent legal environment of the 19th century that preceded the modern Civil Rights era. Octavius Catto was a teacher at Philadelphia’s finest black school and an activist who fought for equal rights, and whose pioneering civil career ended in murder. This session will include discussion of the 1859 trial of a fugitive slave, legal battles over streetcar access, and voting rights and related legal, judicial and ethical considerations.

Presenters: Authors Dan R. Biddle and Murray Dubin

*1 hour Substantive and .5 hours Ethics CLE

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Youth, Punishment and Crime: Sentencing and Reentry | 9:40 to 11:10 a.m.

Main Campus, Center for Business and Industry, Room C2-28

This panel focuses on the direct service and policy advocacy utilized to transform the experiences of children prosecuted in the adult criminal justice system, and to ensure fair and thoughtful resentencing and reentry for juvenile lifers, or individuals who were sentenced to life without parole as children.

Presenter: Joanna Visser Adjoian, director, Youth Sentencing and Reentry Project (YSRP)

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

 

Philadelphia CSI | 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Northeast Regional Center, Room 124

The Philadelphia Police Department’s Crime Scene Unit will explain its role in photographing and sketching crime scenes, as well as its method in the identification and processing of crime scene evidence. Actual and sometimes graphic crime scene photos will be shown.

*2 hours Substantive CLE

 

Legal Implications of Nursing | 9:40 to 11:10 a.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

Paul Bechtel, Esq., a nationally renowned expert on law and medicine, and a veteran of more than 300 jury trials, will discuss nursing and issues of legal liability in medicine. Mr. Bechtel is a retired partner of Marshall, Dennehey, Warner, Coleman & Goggin.

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

 

Answering the Call for Political Renewal | 11:20 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Main CampusBonnell Building, Large Auditorium

The overarching message of the 2016 political season—embodied in the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump campaigns—is that many voters have lost faith in the ability of our political process to govern this country. What reforms to the process should be on the agenda, locally and nationally, to restore that faith and the sense that democracy can work again? What can individuals, especially law students early in their careers, do to help bring about those changes? David Thornburgh of the Committee of Seventy leads a panel on these important issues.

 

Cristina Henríquez: The Book of Unknown Americans | 12:40 to 2 p.m.
Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Room S2-19

Author Cristina Henríquez will discuss her book, which highlights issues of immigrants and immigration to the United States. Set in Delaware, the story focuses on two main characters. Woven into the story are the voices and experiences of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Central and Latin America.

Co-sponsored by the International Festival

 

Ethics in City Government | 1 to 2:30 p.m.

Main CampusBonnell Building, Large Auditorium

Contemporary government at all jurisdictional levels is guided by and funded by a complex and ever-increasing maze of laws, administrative rules and regulations, and practices. Compliance with these directives is required of government employees and those who do business with government. Philadelphia's Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is the government watchdog with the power to investigate corruption, fraud, waste, and dishonest and unethical practices. Members of the OIG will discuss their role in this important area of ethics.

Moderator: William Mulkeen, Esq., adjunct instructor, Paralegal Studies

Presenters: Amy L. Kurland, Inspector General and Kathleen T. McAfee, First Deputy Inspector General, City of Philadelphia

*1.5 hours Ethics CLE

 

Responding to the Concerns of Black Lives Matter: Criminal Justice Reform Efforts in Philadelphia | 2:40 to 4:10 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

Join us for a panel discussion about how Philadelphia's lawmakers and local authorities have responded to police tensions, incarceration rates, racial profiling and biased sentencing post-Ferguson. A review of initiatives that have been launched in response to these challenges will be addressed.

Panelists: Debonair Oates-Primus, assistant professor, English and Michael Coard, Esq.

Co-sponsored by the President's Diversity Council

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

 

Grand Tech Auto Squad: A 21st Century Approach to Auto Crime | 12 to 1:15 p.m.

West Regional Center, Auto Lab

This exciting presentation by the Auto Squad of the Major Crimes Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department will explain and demonstrate the latest technologies and techniques for investigating and solving auto thefts and insurance fraud.

Presenter: Staff Inspector Jerrold Bates, Specialized Investigations Bureau and members of the Auto Squad

Co-sponsored by the Automotive Technology Services Program

*1.25 hours Substantive CLE

 

Homeland Security Mobile Command Post Tours | 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

West Regional Center, Main Entrance

Visit the nerve center of a mobile command post operated by the Homeland Security Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department. Come see the cutting-edge equipment of modern emergency management.

 

Marijuana Law: What’s the Future? | 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Winnet Student Life Building, Great Hall, Room S2-19

This panel looks at the state of laws on marijuana and discusses upcoming changes for Pennsylvania in the emerging medical marijuana and industrial hemp markets. This session focuses on the distribution, zoning laws and local ordinances, and investment and cannabis banking issues in Pennsylvania, along with other areas as it relates to cannabis business law.

Panelists: Steven Schain, Esq. and Patricia M. Hoban, Esq. of Hoban Law Group

*1.5 hours Substantive CLE

 

Friday, March  3, 2017

Judicial Affairs Conference

8:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

For more information, contact: LawCenter@ccp.edu

*4.5 hours Substantive CLE


Screening of 13th, Followed by Expert Panel Discussion | 3:30-6:30 p.m.

Main Campus, Bonnell Auditorium, Room BG-20

13th, the acclaimed documentary from director Ana DuVernay which looks at race in the Criminal Justice System, opens with the premise that 25 percent of the entire world's incarcerated population is in the United States and presents the argument that mass incarceration in the U.S. perpetuates slavery.  The film has been nominated for an Oscar at the 89th Academy Awards. A panel of experts led by Keir Bradford-Grey, will discuss the issues presented following the screening.

*1 hour Substantive CLE

 

Explore Photos of Law Society at the 2016 events

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2016 Survey Results

Session % "Yes" Expectation per title % "Yes" Learned Something New/Interesting/ Valuable % "Yes" Would Like to Learn More
Screening of Our Way Home: Transitioning From the Front Lines to the Homefront & Plenary Q&A 90% 90% 87%
The Last Jimmy: A Hip Hop Musical Film Screening and Talk-Back Session 100% 100% 75%
Reducing Philadelphia Incarceration Rates: Perspectives from the Criminal Justice Community 94% 98% 85%
Reparations and Reconciliation in the US: The Legal Landscape 79% 86% 79%
A City Story: Girard College and its Legacy and Future 94% 94% 85%
Domestic Violence and Updates to PFA Laws 100% 95% 76%
Screening: Kids for Cash 100% 100% 100%
Ethics in City Government 94% 99% 80%
The Presidential Election: Students Explain the Issues 100% 88% 68%
Election Year Focus! 97% 88% 65%
Trans101 - Transgender Ally Training 100% 100% 100%
International Refugees: Population in Crisis 100% 96% 78%
Model Grand Jury of a Police-Involved Shooting 100% 100% 82%
Investigating a Cold Case Homicide 80% 94% 88%
New and Old Threats to Free Speech on Campus 100% 90% 81%
Criminal Records: Impact and Expungement 96% 92% 88%
Screening: Touched, A Film by Terrance Tykeem 72% 78% 89%
Racial Profiling 94% 97% 86%
Legal Implications of Nursing 94% 90% 86%
Judicial Independence 95% 95% 86%
Philadelphia CSI 100% 97% 100%
Youth Court and its Role in Social Justice 95% 97% 86%
Guises: Exploring the Relationship between Theater and Reentry at CCP 100% 97% 64%
Grand Tech Auto Squad: A 21st Century Approach to the Auto Crime  100% 96% 89%
Copyrights and the Self-Published Songwriter/Artist 100% 98% 83%
Ethics 101 for Public and Elected Officials 80% 77% 74%
Judicial Ethics: Reality and Perception 82% 97% 91%